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Canadian Latter-day Saints join World Interfaith Harmony Week celebrations across the country

Tree of Harmony artwork in the Halifax Public Library, Canada

Under the direction of Joanna Mirsky Wexler of Shaar Shalom Synagogue in Halifax, Nova Scotia, an interfaith youth group created this original art piece for World Interfaith Harmony Week in February 2021. The piece is titled “Tree of Harmony” and hangs in the Halifax Public Library. Latter-day Saint Calla Quist co-ordinated the final design.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints


Church members in Canada are learning about other faiths and building bridges in their communities as they take part in World Interfaith Harmony Week celebrations. According to Canada Newsroom, a variety of events are happening across the country, with topics including music, prayer, hope, peace, dialogue, spirituality and harmony.

In Edmonton, Alberta, for example, Latter-day Saint representative and event organizer Eileen Bell shared: “I love being able to learn more about other faiths. It helps me understand people better and makes me feel closer to them. I think that building bridges between groups of believers helps unite people wanting to achieve good purposes together.”

Bell co-coordinated an event exploring how different faiths pray. Another event is about addressing Islamophobia in Canada. The Church recently published a pamphlet to enhance understanding between those of Muslim and Latter-day Saint faiths.

World Interfaith Harmony Week is Feb. 1-7 this year. It was first introduced in 2010 to strengthen interfaith bonds and promote harmony throughout the religious world. Other cities across Canada are also participating in World Interfaith Harmony Week events, including Calgary, Alberta; Halifax, Nova Scotia; and Surrey, British Columbia.

Read more at Canada Newsroom.

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