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Beginning with the Cubs, Brazilian youth learn the value of serving others

The lives of tens of thousands of young boys and their families have been enriched since the Cub Scout program was officially adopted by the Primary Association in 1952.

Many young LDS boys have their first experiences with the Scouting program through the Primary, which has responsibility for the Cub (8-through-10-year-olds) and Blazer (11-year-olds) Scouts.In Brazil, for example, many Primary boys enthusiastically begin their Scouting experiences through the Primary's Cubbing program. One stake where Cub Scouts are growing in number is the Sao Paulo Brazil North Stake, where during the past year three Cub Scouts received the Southern Cross, the highest award in Cub Scouting in Brazil.

The three Cub Scouts are Andre Bueno Silviera, David ZuAiga and Valerio Sanches Kikuchi.

"They enjoy Scouting very much," said stake Pres. Valerio Kikuchi, father of one of the Cub Scouts. "Scouting teaches them that it is important to serve others. We have a very active program in the Primary and Young Men, with active leaders. The Scouts often go camping in the country and take part in other major events."

The boys have been involved in Cubbing for about three and a half years, said Pres. Kikuchi. He said Primary leaders have taken a particular interest in promoting the program.

Demar Stanicia, Brazil public communications director, estimated that at least 500 Primary boys and Young Men take part in Church-sponsored Scouting in Brazil. They are in the Sao Paulo North, Sao Paulo Taboao, Rio de Janeiro Madureira, and various other stakes and wards in the country.

Scouts and their leaders receive training in leadership and learn outdoor skills associated with camping, he said. They also help in their own service projects and support service projects of various organizations.

"They learn how to lead, and how to help as they take part in national and regional programs and activities," said Brother Stanicia.

"Scouting helps prepare them for leadership; they learn how to lead a group of Aaronic Priesthood youth."

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