BETA

1998 — The year in review

The year 1998 has been significant for temples.

President Gordon B. Hinckley announced in last April conference that 30 smaller temples would be built, making a total of 100 temples by the year 2000. At the conference, President Hinckley did not announce specific locations, but shortly after the conference, announcements started to be made of cities and countries where the temples would be located.

By the year's end, 28 new temples had been announced, and new temple sites proliferated across the world, touching Africa, Asia, the South Pacific, Mexico, Canada, Eastern Europe, and the United States.

In addition to announcements of new temples during the year, ground was broken and construction was started on 15 temples. Also during the year, the the Preston England Temple and the first of the smaller temples, the Monticello Utah Temple, were dedicated.

Among other significant happenings in 1998 was the visit of President Hinckley to Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe and South Africa on Feb. 14-22, the first visit of a Church president to western Africa and Kenya. He also traveled thousands of miles to visit members and hold meetings in Canada, Atlantic islands, Europe, Mexico, Central America, and across the United States.

A number of other significant events occured during the year, including the great outpouring of assistance from the Church following the devastation of Hurricane Mitch in Central America.

The following is a review of important events that occured during 1998:

JANUARY

Jan. 4: Speaking at a Church Educational System fireside at the BYU Marriott Center, Elder Neal A. Maxwell of the Quorum of the Twelve said every person on earth shares immortality and therefore has immense possibilities in striving for discipleship.

Jan. 7-9: Thousands of Church members were without electricity for more than a week following the worst ice storm to ever hit the northeast United States and eastern Canada.

Jan. 9: Elder Paul H. Dunn, emeritus General Authority noted for his ability to teach the gospel and for his advocacy of the youth of the Church, died in Salt Lake City of cardiac arrest. He had been a General Authority for 25 years.

Jan. 10: Thirteen new missions, 10 of them in South America, were announced by the First Presidency: California Long Beach, Canada Edmonton, Florida Orlando, Ohio Cincinnati, Utah Salt Lake City South, Madagascar Antananarivo, Taiwan Kaohsiung, Australia Melbourne West, Bolivia Santa Cruz, Brazil Joao Pessoa, Brazil Goinia, Brazil Santa Maria and Paraguay Asuncion North.

Jan. 11: President Hinckley spoke at a regional conference to more than 7,200 members of stakes in Woods Cross and North Salt Lake in Utah.

Jan. 15: A letter to General Authorities and local leaders in the United States from the First Presidency reiterated past counsel that Church members be full participants in political, governmental and community affairs, and that they seek out and uphold leaders in government who are wise, good and honest.

Jan. 12-16: Elder David B. Haight of the Quorum of the Twelve addressed a seminar for eight newly called presidents of Church missionary training centers.

Jan. 18: The Honolulu Stake Tabernacle, dedicated in 1941, a spiritual refuge for LDS servicemen and servicewomen, was rededicated by Elder David E. Sorensen of the Seventy.

Jan. 20: Speaking to the St. George Area Chamber of Commerce in Utah during its installation banquet, President Hinckley urged his listeners to "cultivate the great spirit of voluntarism which has characterized this community from its pioneer beginnings."

Jan. 22: California Gov. Pete Wilson met with local Church leaders in the State Capitol in Sacramento to accept a copy of a new LDS video depicting the Mormon Battalion's role in the development of the state.

Jan. 25: President Hinckley addressed two sessions of the Sandy Utah Central Regional conference, speaking to more than 10,000 members.

FEBRUARY

Feb. 1: President Boyd K. Packer, acting president of the Quorum of the Twelve, answered claims that the Church is not a Christian church and that its members are not Christians at a Church Educational System fireside at the BYU Marriott Center.

Feb. 3: In a devotional address at BYU, Robert L. Millet, dean of Religious Education at BYU, presented answers to questions sometimes posed to Latter-day Saints — and sometimes adversarial in nature — regarding scripture, God, Christ and salvation.

Feb. 3: Diplomats from 10 predominantly Muslim countries joined prominent representatives from the Church to celebrate the first published work of Islamic translations by BYU Press at a gala dinner in Washington, D.C.

Feb. 8: President Hinckley spoke to nearly 6,000 persons at the Salt Lake Holladay Regional Conference in the Salt Lake Tabernacle.

Feb. 14-22: President Hinckley toured five nations in Africa: Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe and South Africa. He was the first Church president ever to visit West Africa. During the meetings, he spoke to more than 30,000 persons.

Feb. 16: President Hinckley announced plans for a temple to be built in Ghana, the first in West Africa.

Feb. 17: Elder M. Russell Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve spoke on building bridges of understanding in an address at the Logan Institute of Religion. He discussed and clarified five doctrinal subjects often misunderstood by those of other faiths.

Feb. 22: A powerful message about the Book of Mormon was featured in the annual Missionary Satellite Open House that included a message from Elder Henry B. Eyring of the Quorum of the Twelve.

Feb. 25: Church members in the Orlando, Fla., area helped in cleanup after tornadoes touched down in the community of Kissimmee on Feb. 22-23.

Feb. 28: Members of the Bakersfield California Stake provided relief efforts to residents of the nearby farming community of Earlimart in the wake of storms and floods.

MARCH

March 1: President Hinckley rededicated a historic, early 20th century meetinghouse in Springville, Utah.

March 1: At a Church Educational System fireside in the BYU Marriott Center, Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve distinguished between righteous and unrighteous judgment.

March 7: Ground for one of the new, smaller temples at Colonia Juarez Mexico was broken by Elder Eran A. Call of the Seventy and president of the Mexico North Area.

March 9-15: President Hinckley visited 10 cities of northern Mexico: Hermosillo, Ciudad Obregon, Culiacan, Guadalajara, Torreon, Leon, Ciudad Victoria, Monterrey, Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez. He addressed a total of more than 53,000 members.

March 10: President Thomas S. Monson, first counselor in the First Presidency, counseled students at a BYU devotional assembly relative to making choices with eternal consequences.

March 10: President Monson rededicated the newly renovated Carl F. Eyring Science Center at BYU.

March 18: Two missionaries were kidnapped in Saratov, Russia, some 450 miles southeast of Moscow. Elders Travis Tuttle, Gilbert, Ariz.; and Andrew Propst, Lebanon, Ore.; were released unharmed four days later. Police made two arrests in the kidnapping.

March 26: After 2 1/2 years of careful reconstruction, the Egbert B. Grandin Building in Palmyra, N.Y., where the Book of Mormon was published in 1829, was dedicated as a Church historic site by President Hinckley.

March 27: A replica of the Joseph Smith Sr. family log home near Palmyra, N.Y., was dedicated by President Hinckley. The home was the location where the Prophet Joseph Smith was visited in his youth by the Angel Moroni.

March 28: Ground was broken for the Billings Montana Temple by Elder Hugh W. Pinnock of the Seventy and president of the North America Central Area.

March 28: President James E. Faust, second counselor in the First Presidency, addressed the General Young Women Meeting, originating from the Tabernacle on Temple Square. The Young Women general presidency also spoke.

APRIL

April 4-5: At the the 168th Annual General Conference, a program to construct an additional 30 smaller temples was announced by President Hinckley.

Also at the conference: Called from the Second Quorum of the Seventy to the First Quorum of the Seventy were Elders Sheldon F. Child, Quentin L. Cook and Francisco J. Vinas.

Called to the Second Quorum of the Seventy were Elders Athos M. Amorim, E Ray Bateman, Val R. Christensen, Ronald T. Halverson, Earl M. Monson, Merrill C. Oaks, H. Bryan Richards, Ned B. Roueche, D. Lee Tobler, Gordon T. Watts, Stephen A. West, Robert J. Whetten and Ray H. Wood.

Sixteen men were called to serve as Area Authority Seventies in the Third, Fourth and Fifth Quorums of the Seventy.

April 15: President Hinckley received the Legacy of Life Award from the LDS Hospital-Deseret Foundation at a meeting in Salt Lake City.

April 17: Ground was broken for a temple in Anchorage, Alaska, by Elder F. Melvin Hammond of the Seventy and president of the North America Northwest Area.

April 22: President Monson and his wife, Frances, received the Continuum of Caring Humanitarian Award from the Friends of St. Joseph Villa, a Catholic health care facility in Salt Lake City.

April 24: Before an estimated 1,200 onlookers in the State Capitol in Jefferson City, Mo., Gov. Mel Carnahan and Elder Hugh W. Pinnock of the Seventy cut a ribbon opening a three-month exhibit, "A Commemoration of the Mormon Experience in Missouri."

April 24: In the first-ever address of a Church president to a conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, President Hinckley said a father should stand as the pillar of strength in every household. He spoke to the Western Region 1 Leadership Conference of the NAACP in Salt Lake City.

April 25: After trying for three years to gain approval to build a temple in the suburb of Forest Hills near Nashville, Tenn., Church leaders announced they will move ahead with plans to build a temple somewhere else in the Nashville area.

April 25: President Hinckley announced at a member meeting in Columbus, Ohio, that a temple would be built in that city.

April 26: President Hinckley addressed 20,000 people at the famed Madison Square Garden in New York City.

April 27: President Faust was made an "Honorary Citizen of Sao Paulo," Brazil, receiving an award from the city's Municipal Council.

April 29: President Monson was honored by the National Conference of Community and Justice (formerly National Conference of Christians and Jews) at an awards banquet in Salt Lake City for lifetime advocacy, service and dedication to the state of Utah and the betterment of humanity.

MAY

May 1: President Faust broke ground for the Campinas Brazil Temple.

May 2: President Faust broke ground for the Porto Alegre Brazil Temple.

May 3: President Hinckley spoke to some 12,000 at a regional conference of Church members in North Ogden, Utah.

May 14: The Church was given official recognition in Russia as a centralized religious organization, clarifying its status under a new law passed in Russia in 1997. The Church received a certificate allowing it to continue its humanitarian and missionary efforts in the country and to provide meeting places for its members.

May 17: President Hinckley addressed a total of 13,000 Church members at two sessions of a regional conference in Atlanta, Ga.

JUNE

June 2: President Hinckley addressed more than 3,000 Church members from the Augusta and Bangor stakes in Maine and the Exeter stake in New Hampshire at a meeting in Portland, Maine.

June 4-6: On a tour of Europe, President Hinckley addressed more than 12,000 Church members at meetings in Versailles, France; Frankfurt, Germany; and Geneva, Switzerland.

June 7-10: President Hinckley dedicated the Preston England Temple in the first of 15 sessions. He addressed 13 of the sessions.

June 13: Ground was broken for a temple in Houston, Texas, by Elder Lynn A. Mickelsen of the Seventy and president of the North America Southwest Area.

June 12: President Hinckley was the speaker at the University of Utah commencement exercises, addessing 6,000 students.

June 14-July 2: The Tabernacle Choir performed in seven nations of Europe. The tour included performances in London, England; Brussels, Belgium; Geneva, Switzerland; Turin, Italy; Rome, Italy; Marseille, France; Barcelona, Spain; El Escorial, Spain; Madrid, Spain; and Lisbon, Portugal.

June 20: Ground was broken for New Mexico's first temple, the Albuquerque temple, by Elder Mickelsen of the Seventy.

June 23: Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve testified before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee in favor of the proposed Senate bill called the Religious Liberty Protection Act of 1998. It would restore safeguards in the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act that were struck down by the U.S.

Supreme Court in 1997.

June 23-26: Newly called mission presidents heard instruction from the First Presidency and members of the Quorum of the Twelve at the Mission Presidents Seminar in Provo, Utah.

June 28: The first meetinghouse in Ukraine was dedicated in Donetsk by Elder Wayne M. Hancock of the Seventy and second counselor in the Europe East Area presidency.

JULY

July 19: With the Zurich Boys Choir appearing on the program as guest performers, the Tabernacle Choir commenced its 70th year of the weekly radio broadcast "Music and the Spoken Word."

July 25: President Hinckley dedicated a new monument honoring the Pony Express. The sculpture was replicated from a design by noted LDS artist Avard Fairbanks and is located on the Pony Express route of 1860-61 at This Is the Place Heritage Park in Salt Lake City.

July 26-27: The Monticello Utah Temple — the prototype for a new generation of small temples in less-populous areas of the Church — was dedicated by President Hinckley in the first of eight sessions.

July 29: Two new temples, to be built in Bismarck, N.D., and St. Paul, Minn., were announced by the First Presidency.

July 31-Aug. 8: President Hinckley addressed more than 50,000 Church members during an eight-day, 12-city tour of Canada. He held meetings in Victoria, Vancouver and Prince George, British Columbia; Lethbridge and Edmonton, Alberta; Regina, Saskatchewan; Winnipeg, Manitoba; Sudbury, Ottawa, and Hamilton, Ontario; Montreal, and Quebec City, Quebec.

AUGUST

Aug. 3, 6: New temples to be built in Regina, Saskatchewan, and Montreal, Quebec, were announced by President Hinckley during visits to those cities on his Canadian tour.

Aug. 8: Sites for four temples were announced by the First Presidency, including the first to be built in the former Soviet Union, in Kiev, Ukraine. Other temples will be built in Hermosillo and Tampico, Mexico; and Brisbane, Australia.

Aug. 11: The First Presidency announced a temple will be built in Edmonton, Alberta.

Aug. 15: Five new areas — or administrative geographical divisions — of the Church went into effect. The new areas are Africa West, Brazil North, South America West, Pacific Islands and North America East, bringing the total number of areas to 28. At the same time, new area presidency assignments went into effect.

Aug. 15: Three General Authorities who had been serving in the First Quorum of the Seventy were called to the Presidency of the Seventy: Elders D. Todd Christofferson, Marlin K. Jensen and David E. Sorensen. Released from the presidency were Elders Monte J. Brough, W. Eugene Hansen and Jack H Goaslind.

Aug. 27: A new, three-story missionary training center was dedicated in Lima, Peru, by Elder Russell M. Nelson of the Quorum of the Twelve.

Aug. 29: New temples, to be built in Detroit, Mich., and Spokane, Wash., were announced by the First Presidency.

SEPTEMBER

Sept. 5: The First Presidency announced a temple will be built in the Raleigh-Durham, N.C. area.

Sept. 8: President Hinckley appeared on the Cable News Network television show, "Larry King Live," answering questions on a widerange of subjects.

Sept. 11-25: Four more temples were announced by the First Presidency for southeast United States and Mexico. Temples are to be located in Birmingham, Ala., and Columbia, S.C., announced Sept. 11; Memphis, Tenn., announced Sept. 17; and Merida, Mexico, announced Sept. 25.

Sept. 12: Ground was broken for the Columbus Ohio Temple by Elder John K. Carmack of the Seventy and president of the North America East Area. Ohio has the distinction of having the first temple of the Church in this dispensation, dedicated in Kirtland in 1836.

Sept. 12: Speaking at a banquet in Salt Lake City of the Board of Assistants of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants, President Hinckley decried a serious unsteadiness in America's stance in terms of morality, ethics, principles and behavior.

Sept. 26: Ambassadors and diplomats representing 26 countries attended the eighth annual Western Family Picnic at the Marriott Ranch near Washinton D.C. Elder Carmack hosted the event along with Richard and Nancy Marriott.

OCTOBER

Oct. 1: Madame Jehan Sadat, former first lady of Egypt, visited the Relief Society general presidency in Salt Lake City and toured the Humanitarian Center and Welfare Square.

Oct. 3-4: At the Semiannual General Conference, four members of the First Quorum of the Seventy were given emeritus status: Elders Jack H Goaslind, W. Eugene Hansen, James M. Paramore and Ronald E. Poelman.

Elder Goaslind was also released from the Presidency of the Seventy and as Young Men general president. Elder Hansen and Elder Monte J. Brough were also released from the Presidency of the Seventy. Elder Brough is currently president of the North America Southeast Area.

Also released from the Young Men general presidency were Elder Robert K. Dellenbach, first counselor, and Elder F. Melvin Hammond, second counselor.

Released from the Sunday School general presidency were Elder Glenn L. Pace, first counselor, and Elder Neil L. Andersen, second counselor.

Sustained to the Presidency of the Seventy were Elder D. Todd Christofferson, Elder Marlin K. Jensen and Elder David E. Sorensen. They have served in the presidency since Aug. 15.

Sustained to the Young Men general presidency were Elder Robert K. Dellenbach, president; Elder F. Melvin Hammond, first counselor, and Elder John M. Madsen, second counselor.

Sustained to the Sunday School general presidency were Elder Neil L. Anderson, first counselor, and Elder John H. Groberg, second counselor.

Oct. 9: President Hinckley dedicated a monument honoring the first pioneers in the St. George, Utah, area.

Oct. 9-10: A historical marker was placed by the John Watts Berrett Family Genealogical Organiztion at Wyoming, Neb., an outfitting place for departure of westward pioneers from 1864-66.

Oct. 10: Ground was broken for a temple in the Detriot, Mich., area adjacent to the Bloomfield Hills stake center by Elder David E. Sorensen of the Presidency of the Seventy. On the same day, ground was broken for the Spokane Washington Temple, adjacent to the Spokane East stake center, by Elder F. Melvin Hammond of the Seventy and president of the North America Northwest Area.

Oct. 12: Ground was broken for the Halifax Nova Scotia Temple, adjacent to the Dartmouth stake center, by Elder Jay E. Jensen of the Seventy and president of the North America Northeast Area.

Oct. 13: Naomi Randall, who wrote the text to "I Am a Child of God," received a BYU Presidential citation.

Oct. 14-18: President Hinckley traveled through New England, and spoke to 1,600 members in Burlington, Vt.; visited the birthplace of the Prophet Joseph Smith on Oct. 15, and spoke to missionaries. Later, he spoke to 5,500 members in Lowell, Mass. On Oct. 16, he toured the construction site of the Boston Massachusetts Temple, spoke to missionaries, and then to 3,500 members in Worcester, Mass. On Oct. 17, he spoke to members of the Utica and Albany stakes in New York, and on Oct. 18, spoke to 20,000 members in Chicago, Ill.

Oct. 14: The First Presidency announced a temple would be built in Baton Rouge, La.

Oct. 17: Ground was broken for the Bismarck North Dakota Temple by Elder Kenneth Johnson of the Seventy and first counselor in the North America Central Area presidency.

Oct. 17: Two missionaries, Elder Jose Manuel Mackintosh, 20 of Hiko, Nev., and Elder Bradley Alan Borden of Mesa, Ariz., serving in the Russia Yetakerinburg Mission, were attacked and stabbed, resulting in the death of Elder Mackintosh and injury to Elder Borden.

Oct. 20: President Faust addressed a conference in Salt Lake City of police chiefs from throughout the world. Some 14,000 attended the 105th annual conference.

Oct. 24: A new sculpture and park were dedicated in honor of Parley P. Pratt in Salt Lake City by Elder M. Russell Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve.

Oct. 24: One week after a flash flood engulfed communities in Texas, 550 members turned out to assist in the clean up.

Oct. 24: The diplomatic corps in San Francisco, Calif., joined for a Western-style picnic sponsored by the Church.

Oct. 25: Elder John B. Dickson of the Seventy dedicated a plaque to the memory of President Wilford Woodruff in San Francisco where the Church leader died in 1898.

Oct. 28: President Monson dedicated the BYU Salt Lake Center.

Oct. 28: It was announced the Church is assisting in the establishment of a state-of-the-art family history research facility at the Ellis Island, N.Y., Immigration Museum near the Statue of Liberty in the New York Harbor.

Oct. 30: In letters to local priesthood leaders, the First Presidency announced that temples will be built in Melbourne, Australia, and Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico.

Oct. 31: Sister Marjorie P. Hinckley was honored with the Heritage Award by the Utah-California Women in Salt Lake City.

Oct. 31: Elder Vaughn J Featherstone of the Seventy and president of the Australia/New Zealand Area presented a check for $100,000 to help alleviate damage from recent floods in Wollongong, Australia.

Oct. 31: The Church's 47th Deseret Industries store, the largest yet, was dedicated in Provo, Utah, 60 years after after the first such thrift store was opened.

NOVEMBER

Nov. 1: A new married-student housing complex was dedicated at BYU by President Faust.

Nov. 2: In letters to local priesthood leaders, the First Presidency announced a temple would be built in Montevideo, Uruguay.

Nov. 4: Following November elections, 16 members of the Church will serve in the 106th U.S. Congress when it convenes in January 1999.

Nov. 6: President Hinckley received BYU's Marriott School of Business' International Executive of the Year award.

Nov. 6: An exhibit of the 1855 wreck of the sailing ship Julia Ann opened at the Museum of Church History and Art in Salt Lake City.

Nov. 10: The first shipment of more than 600,000 pounds of relief supplies from Salt Lake City was shipped by the Church to victims of the devastating Hurricane Mitch in the Central American nations of Honduras, Nicaragua and Guatemala.

Nov. 11: A 19-story office building in Salt Lake City, owned by the Church, was dedicated by President Hinckley.

Nov. 13-15: President Hinckley visited three mid-Atlantic states and spoke at Greenville, N.C., to more than 8,600 members on Nov. 13; to 7,000 people in Richmond, Va., on Nov. 15; and to more than 7,000 members in Baltimore, Md., on Nov. 15.

Nov. 14: Elder Hugh W. Pinnock of the Seventy and president of the North America Central Area broke ground in Regina, Saskatchewan, for a temple to be built in Wascana View, a suburb of Regina.

Nov. 19-21: President Hinckley visited and offered comfort and assistance to storm-stricken members in Nicaragua and Honduras, promising them they would not be forgotten. He spoke to 16,000 members in Managua, Nicaragua, and in Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

Nov. 21: President Boyd K. Packer, acting president of the Quorum of the Twelve; Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve; and Mary Ellen Smoot, Relief Society general president, addressed "A Celebration of the Second World Conference on Families" in Salt Lake City, promoting a movement to preserve the family as the essential unit of society.

DECEMBER

Dec. 1: The First Presidency and Salt Lake City Mayor Deedee Corradini jointly announced a proposal to close Main Street east of Temple Square to connect Temple Square and the headquarters block with a plaza. The proposal must be approved by the Salt Lake City Council.

Dec. 2: China's ambassador to the United States, Li Zhaoxing, joined Elder John K. Carmack of the Seventy and president of the North America East Area in turning on 300,000 lights at the Washington D.C. Temple grounds.

Dec. 3: Former world champion and Olympic medal winner in the discus, L. Jay Sylvester, now a high councilor in the Orem Utah Lakeridge Stake, was elected to the National Track and Field Hall of Fame in Orlando, Fla.

Dec. 5: Ground was broken for the Columbia South Carolina Temple by Elder Gordon T. Watts of the Seventy and first counselor in the North America Southeast Area presidency.

Dec. 6: President Hinckley, President Monson and President Faust addressed the annual First Presidency Christmas devotional, originating from the Tabernacle on Temple Square, and telecast over the Church satellite network.

Dec. 14: Elder Dallas N. Archibald of the Seventy and president of the Chile Area was reported missing following a fishing accident on the Biobio River in southern Chile. Search efforts were immediately started for the missing leader. His body was recovered Dec. 20.

Dec. 19: Dates in March 1999 for the dedication of the Colonia Juarez Mexico Temple and the Madrid Spain Temple were announced by the First Presidency.

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