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This week in Church history

150 years ago

The Salt Lake Valley's first $1 bills were printed on Jan. 1, 1849, according to A Comprehensive History of the Church 3:406-407. "This was the first printing done in Salt Lake valley," according to the history.

Andrew Jenson's Church Chronology, p. 36, states "the first $1 bill of 'Valley Currency' was signed by Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball and Thos. Bullock." It adds that on Jan. 22, "Pres. Brigham Young and Thos. Bullock were engaged in setting type for the 50-cent bills of the Valley paper currency. This was the first type setting in G.S.L. Valley."

The first pioneers in the valley used what little currency of United States money they brought with them. About $10,000 of money, Spanish doubloons, paid to the members of the Mormon Battalion was used for currency for a time in Salt Lake, according to A Comprehensive History of the Church.

Gold dust brought from California mines by members of the Mormon Battalion was also used for monetary exchange, but was inconvenient and much was wasted when it was weighed. There was an effort made to coin the gold dust, but it failed.

"President Young then proposed to issue paper currency against the gold deposited until the dust on hand could be coined," said the history. "The municipal council of Salt Lake City authorized the issuance of such currency, and appointed Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball and N.K. Whitney to issue it."

That led to the printing of money in 1849.

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