BETA

The story of Alaska

Cultural presentation depicts LDS pioneers, Native Alaskans

In Alaska, the skies are blue

In Alaska, the world is new

In Alaska, so strong and bright

The skies ablaze in northern lights.

The Anchorage Alaska Temple is seen through icicles hanging from adjacent stake center.
The Anchorage Alaska Temple is seen through icicles hanging from adjacent stake center. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — So go the words of the opening song of "In the Shadow of the Mountains," a musical production performed the weekend of the rededication of the Anchorage Alaska Temple. A cast of 600 performed the Feb. 6-7 cultural presentation which depicted the merge of white frontiersmen and Native Alaskan cultures in Alaska. It also portrayed the story of the Mormon pioneers in Alaska.

The cast included members from four stakes, within more than a 75-mile radius, not easy over icy wintertime roads. Some of the children had parents who "made" them get involved, telling them they would feel sorry later if they didn't. That soon changed as youth were glad and anxious to participate. It became the "cool" thing to do, said Karin Stastny Carter of the Brayton Ward, Anchorage Alaska Stake, who was an assistant director of the production, along with Tammy Hogge, also of the Brayton Ward. The play was written and directed by Donna McCarrey of Rabbit Creek Ward, Anchorage Alaska Stake. Directing music for the production was Cam McCarrey Bohman of the Brayton Ward.

Sister McCarrey had been working on the storyline for some time, long before she was asked to do a cultural program. Meanwhile, Sister Bohman was collecting music. When the call came for the cultural event for the dedication, they were all ready. Within a few weeks, auditions were announced.

Kekoa Pascua and Pua Kahumoku perform song during "In the Shadows of the Mountains," which portrayed the merging of the frontiersmen and Native Alaskan cultures.
Kekoa Pascua and Pua Kahumoku perform song during "In the Shadows of the Mountains," which portrayed the merging of the frontiersmen and Native Alaskan cultures. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett
President Gordon B. Hinckley, left, and Elder Robert D. Hales watch cultural presentation in Anchorage.
President Gordon B. Hinckley, left, and Elder Robert D. Hales watch cultural presentation in Anchorage. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett
Below, Primary children are among some 300 young people wearing white and carrying battery-operated candles in finale of presentation.
Below, Primary children are among some 300 young people wearing white and carrying battery-operated candles in finale of presentation. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett
Actors depicting Alaskan LDS pioneers and Native Alaskans perform tender scene.
Actors depicting Alaskan LDS pioneers and Native Alaskans perform tender scene. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett
Members in the Anchorage, Alaska, area perform songs, and frontier and Native Alaskan dances in cultural presentation that shared the story of the Church in Alaska.
Members in the Anchorage, Alaska, area perform songs, and frontier and Native Alaskan dances in cultural presentation that shared the story of the Church in Alaska. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett
Members in the Anchorage, Alaska, area perform songs, and frontier and Native Alaskan dances in cultural presentation that shared the story of the Church in Alaska.
Members in the Anchorage, Alaska, area perform songs, and frontier and Native Alaskan dances in cultural presentation that shared the story of the Church in Alaska. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett
Members in the Anchorage, Alaska, area perform songs, and frontier and Native Alaskan dances in cultural presentation that shared the story of the Church in Alaska.
Members in the Anchorage, Alaska, area perform songs, and frontier and Native Alaskan dances in cultural presentation that shared the story of the Church in Alaska. Photo: Photo by Lynn Howlett

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