BETA

Temple Square ... where visitors will find peace and serenity

Strolling the 10-acre plot with its lush landscaping is a walk in tranquility. Recognized and revered throughout the world, Temple Square is Utah's most popular attraction. Centerpiece is the six-spired temple so beautifully crafted by the pioneer faithful, as well as the uniquely designed Tabernacle. Hourly tours are available in at least 40 languages.

Historic Temple Square
Historic Temple Square Photo: Copyright Intellectual Reserve

1. Salt Lake Temple

Aerial view of the Main Street Plaza (photographed from the Joseph Smith Memorial Building) that opens to the public tomorrow. October, 6, 2000. Photo/Johanna Workman
Aerial view of the Main Street Plaza (photographed from the Joseph Smith Memorial Building) that opens to the public tomorrow. October, 6, 2000. Photo/Johanna Workman

Started in 1853, pioneers labored 40 years for its completion and dedication in 1893. An architectural masterpiece, the temple is recognized worldwide today. Members revere it as a place of God's love and power.

2. Tabernacle

Hundreds enjoy the Commemoration of the Revelation on the Priesthood being available to all worthy men in the Tabernacle in Salt Lake City June 8, 2008 Photo by Scott G. Winterton
Hundreds enjoy the Commemoration of the Revelation on the Priesthood being available to all worthy men in the Tabernacle in Salt Lake City June 8, 2008 Photo by Scott G. Winterton Photo: Dnews

Unique in all the world for its engineering feat, the Tabernacle is home of the world renowned Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Here members have met since the earliest days of the Church to hear the teachings of the prophets. Built by pioneer craftsmen, the Tabernacle is a testament of the love of the people for the things of God.

3. Conference Center

The Crowd leaves the Conference Center at the end of the Morning Session of LDS General Conference April 6, 2008. Photo by Scott G. Winterton / Deseret Morning News.
The Crowd leaves the Conference Center at the end of the Morning Session of LDS General Conference April 6, 2008. Photo by Scott G. Winterton / Deseret Morning News. Photo: Dnews
Inside the Conference Center during LDS General Conference April 6, 2008. Photo by Scott G. Winterton / Deseret Morning News.
Inside the Conference Center during LDS General Conference April 6, 2008. Photo by Scott G. Winterton / Deseret Morning News. Photo: Dnews

As the Church has grown, so has the number of those who wish to attend General Conference. Out of a desire to accommodate as many members as possible, President Gordon B. Hinckley commissioned the construction of the Conference Center across the street from Temple Square. Each General Conference upwards of 100,000 people attend to receive inspired instruction from Church leaders.

4. North Visitors Center

Visitors make their way up to the Christus at the north visitors center at Temple Square, Tuesday, July 30, 2002.

photo by Jeremy Harmon                                (Submission date: 07/30/2002)
Visitors make their way up to the Christus at the north visitors center at Temple Square, Tuesday, July 30, 2002. photo by Jeremy Harmon (Submission date: 07/30/2002) Photo: Jeremy Harmon
Seth St. Clair, Provo, look at the Christus in the Temple Square visitors center during LDS General Conference Apr 6, 2007 in Salt Lake City.   Jeffrey D. Allred/photo
Seth St. Clair, Provo, look at the Christus in the Temple Square visitors center during LDS General Conference Apr 6, 2007 in Salt Lake City. Jeffrey D. Allred/photo

Visitors to Temple Square are inspired by the 11-foot-tall Christus statue prominently displayed in the rotunda.

5. Assembly Hall

Assembly Hall on temple square photo by ravell call
Assembly Hall on temple square photo by ravell call Photo: DNEWS

Stately and majestic, the Assembly Hall was constructed in 1882 as a meeting hall. Today, weekly concerts for public enjoyment and meetings are held.

6. South Visitors Center

With a spectacular view of the temple through large glass windows, the South Visitors Center offers visitors a peaceful setting for contemplation and meditation. Among other things, visitors will enjoy an interactive display on families and the purpose of temples.

7. Museum of Church History and Art

Popular among visitors for its extensive display of major historical artifacts of the Church, including the current feature of the Tabernacle with cross sections of its intricate roof work.

8. Family History Library

Popular among people from around the globe, the Family History Library houses the largest genealogical collection of its kind in the world. Researchers come to discover their familial roots.

9. Relief Society Building

Headquarters for the Relief Society, Young Women and Primary organizations.

10. Joseph Smith Memorial Building

The former Utah Motel is now celebrating it's 10th anniversary as the Joseph Smith Memorial Building.
photo/ Kira Horvath (Submission date: 06/26/2003)
The former Utah Motel is now celebrating it's 10th anniversary as the Joseph Smith Memorial Building. photo/ Kira Horvath (Submission date: 06/26/2003)
Centerville's Berdine Tingey plays the lobby piano once a month in the Joseph Smith Memorial Building.
photo/ Kira Horvath (Submission date: 06/26/2003)
Centerville's Berdine Tingey plays the lobby piano once a month in the Joseph Smith Memorial Building. photo/ Kira Horvath (Submission date: 06/26/2003)

Named after Joseph Smith, the founding Prophet of the Church, this stately building of marble and granite houses a 500-seat theater where the 68-minute film, Joseph Smith: The Prophet of the Restoration, is presented. Visitors may also use computers established to find information about ancestors, and enjoy lunch and dinner on the building's 10th floor.

11. Church Office Building

Then and now: 
The LDS Church Office building in 2005, as seen from State Street.
Then and now: The LDS Church Office building in 2005, as seen from State Street. Photo: Lynn Arave

The Church Office Building is the tallest building along the Salt Lake City skyline, and provides a great outlook on the Salt Lake Valley. Housed in its 26 stories are leaders and departments of the Church.

12. Church Administration Building

This stately edifice was built in 1912. Church presidents since Joseph F. Smith have performed their administrative duties from here. The building is not open to public tours.

13. Lion House

Finished in 1856, it was once a residence of Brigham Young, receiving its name from lions sculpted over the front facade.

14. Beehive House

LDS Beehive House  (Submission date: 10/11/2002)
LDS Beehive House (Submission date: 10/11/2002) Photo: AP

Built in 1854, this stately manor served as residence of Brigham Young, second president of the Church and colonizer of the American West, and headquarters of the Church until construction of the Church Administration Building.

15. Brigham Young Historic Park

A place of peace and serenity established across the street from the Church Office Building. Here City Creek runs a water wheel and irrigates a garden much as early settlers would have known. Free summer evening concerts are held amid the fragrance of beautiful gardens.

Sorry, no more articles available