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Daughters in My Kingdom: Witness of divine roles

Book touches Church members on personal level, confirms identity

The new history of women in the Church, titled Daughters in My Kingdom: The History and Work of Relief Society,i/>, is impacting Latter-day Saints on a personal level.

Sister Julie B. Beck, Relief Society general president, said that is because the book is more than just a history. It is a "witness of women's divine identity and roles," she said.

The new Relief Society history, Daughters in My Kingdom, will be translated and distributed to Relief Society sisters across the globe, including women in the Seamay 2nd Branch in Guatemala, above, standing outside their meetinghouse.
The new Relief Society history, Daughters in My Kingdom, will be translated and distributed to Relief Society sisters across the globe, including women in the Seamay 2nd Branch in Guatemala, above, standing outside their meetinghouse. Photo: Photo by Alan Gibby, Deseret News

Copies of Daughters in My Kingdom are being distributed to women around the world. The 208-page book was mailed this month to all English-speaking Church congregations. It is not a comprehensive history of Relief Society, nor is it an LDS manual. Intended as a personal and family resource, the book will be printed in 22 other languages in the next few months.

"It is an epic story and it is a record of the spiritual legacy of the women of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," said Sister Beck. "It confirms an immovable standard of what we believe and what we defend."

The book is organized by themes such as family, sisterhood and charity. Each chapter includes stories of Latter-day Saint women throughout history and around the world today.

Choir performs at the cornerstone ceremony during the dedication of the San Salvador El Salvador Temple.
Choir performs at the cornerstone ceremony during the dedication of the San Salvador El Salvador Temple. Photo: Jason Swensen, Deseret News

Sister Beck explained that studying the history of Relief Society gives definition and expression to who Latter-day Saint women are as disciples and followers of the Savior.

She said she can't think of a time in history when the book has been more needed.

This week, the Church News features some of the feelings and experiences of Latter-day Saints who have read the book.

Magdalena Cuz makes visits to other women that belong to her LDS congregation in Seamay, Guatemala.
Magdalena Cuz makes visits to other women that belong to her LDS congregation in Seamay, Guatemala. Photo: Alan Gibby, Deseret News

"We've had stories written for the historians. We've had stories written for the scholars. We've had stories written for the press. But we've never had the story written for the women themselves," Sister Beck said.

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