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Ground is broken for Philadelphia Pennsylvania Temple

A new building will soon be added to the Philadelphia skyline. Leaders from the Church, with the help of local community leaders, broke ground for the Philadelphia Pennsylvania Temple on Saturday, 17 September 2011.

Philadelphia Temple Groundbreaking from Hudson Whitenight on Vimeo.

President Henry B. Eyring, first counselor in the First Presidency. presided over the groundbreaking ceremony. At his side was Elder Jay E. Jensen of the Presidency of the Seventy, Elder William R. Walker, executive director of the Church’s Temple Department, and Elder Robert B. Smith of the Seventy. The Church leaders were joined by Mayor Michael Nutter and other local community and religious dignitaries.

President Henry B. Eyring, who presided at the groundbreaking ceremony, stands before an architectural rendering of the historic and classical-style temple, which will stand in Logan Square near Philadelphia's stately library and courthouse.
President Henry B. Eyring, who presided at the groundbreaking ceremony, stands before an architectural rendering of the historic and classical-style temple, which will stand in Logan Square near Philadelphia's stately library and courthouse. Photo: Photo by Laurie Williams Sowby
Ground was broken Saturday morning, Sept. 17, for the Philadelphia Pennsylvania Temple which will rise on Vine Street in the heart of downtown Philadelphia. Turning the first shovelfuls of earth are Elder William R. Walker, executive director of the Church's Temple Department; President Henry B. Eyring of the First Presidency; President Jay Jensen of the Seventy, and Elder Robert B. Smith, Area Seventy.
Ground was broken Saturday morning, Sept. 17, for the Philadelphia Pennsylvania Temple which will rise on Vine Street in the heart of downtown Philadelphia. Turning the first shovelfuls of earth are Elder William R. Walker, executive director of the Church's Temple Department; President Henry B. Eyring of the First Presidency; President Jay Jensen of the Seventy, and Elder Robert B. Smith, Area Seventy. Photo: Photo by Laurie Williams Sowby
An artist rendering of the Philadelphia Pennsylvania Temple.
An artist rendering of the Philadelphia Pennsylvania Temple. Photo: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

"The work done in these sacred buildings becomes the crowning element of our religious worship," said President Henry B. Eyring. "For Latter-day Saints, no building is more sacred than a dedicated temple of God."

Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter, left, has worked with Church leaders in the area to bring the first temple in Pennsylvania to his city. He said the temple will be “another magnificent addition to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway” when it is completed in about three years.
Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter, left, has worked with Church leaders in the area to bring the first temple in Pennsylvania to his city. He said the temple will be “another magnificent addition to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway” when it is completed in about three years. Photo: Photo by Laurie Williams Sowby
Children were among those who took a turn at the shovels following the official ceremony. In addition to invited guests, members throughout the temple district could view the proceedings live at their local chapels.
Children were among those who took a turn at the shovels following the official ceremony. In addition to invited guests, members throughout the temple district could view the proceedings live at their local chapels. Photo: Photo by Laurie Williams Sowby
A choir directed by Linda Davenport sings at the groundbreaking of the Philadelphia Temple under cloudy but rainless skies.
A choir directed by Linda Davenport sings at the groundbreaking of the Philadelphia Temple under cloudy but rainless skies. Photo: Photo by Laurie Williams Sowby
Invited guests sit in the present parking lot where construction will soon begin on the temple. Philadelphia's modern downtown skyline can be seen across the Vine Street Expressway.
Invited guests sit in the present parking lot where construction will soon begin on the temple. Philadelphia's modern downtown skyline can be seen across the Vine Street Expressway. Photo: Photo by Laurie Williams Sowby

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