These 3 mosaics found in a Galilean village by a BYU graduate uncover surprising facts about ancient Jewish worship

In the summer of 2012, Bryan R. Bozung happened upon an amazing discovery — massive mosaics depicting biblical scenes — on the floor of an ancient Jewish synagogue in the Galilean village of Huqoq.

Bryan R. Bozung, a recent graduate of Brigham Young University at the time, could only point a trembling finger at the "variation in color and faint lines" he had uncovered from its millennium-old hiding place, he told BYU Magazine.

After alerting the team lead, Jodi Magness, an archaeologist from the University of North Carolina, used a paintbrush to reveal a depiction of a woman.

“I was truly speechless,” said Bozung.

The original goal of Bozung’s research team was to uncover data to "improve Galilean synagogue dating,” BYU Magazine said. However, the project quickly changed from data retrieval to elaborate excavation.

BYU graduate Bryan R. Bozung was the first to discover mosaics depicting biblical scenes in the Galilean village of Huqoq. These mosaics reveal depictions of Samson, Jonah, Noah’s ark and Pharaoh’s army swallowed up in the Red Sea. There are also glimpses of daily life in antiquity and a mysterious non-biblical story.
BYU graduate Bryan R. Bozung was the first to discover mosaics depicting biblical scenes in the Galilean village of Huqoq. These mosaics reveal depictions of Samson, Jonah, Noah’s ark and Pharaoh’s army swallowed up in the Red Sea. There are also glimpses of daily life in antiquity and a mysterious non-biblical story.

“All of a sudden we had this precious ancient art that needed to be excavated fully,” said Matthew J. Grey, BYU ancient scripture professor and supervisor for the synagogue excavation.

Though finding an ancient mosaic is rare and these mosaics are heavily damaged, the team has uncovered scenes “never found in an ancient synagogue in Israel,” said BYU Magazine. The six-year project led to the discoveries of biblical depictions of Samson, Jonah, Noah’s ark and Pharaoh’s army swallowed up in the Red Sea. There are also glimpses of daily life in antiquity and a mysterious non-biblical story.

Researchers say the Huqoq mosaics and those found at select other sites have helped to reframe the conception of ancient Jewish worship, said BYU Magazine.

“While they were still fully integrated within Jewish society,” Grey said, “We now have evidence that some communities were more open than others to the Greco-Roman world around them.”

Learn more about the three select panels from the mosaics found in Huqoq:

Read the full story on BYU Magazine.