In case you missed it: President Nelson’s new Spanish Instagram account, Elder Bednar on finding answers to questions, plus 7 more stories

During the week of Sept. 12-18, President Russell M. Nelson launched a Spanish Instagram account. Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taught young adults about finding their own answers, and Elder Neil L. Anderson of the Twelve Apostles reflected on recent visit to the Church historic sites in the Eastern U.S. 

Elder Ronald A. Rasband of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and Sister Sharon Eubank, first counselor in the Relief Society general presidency and president of Latter-day Saint Charities, presented at the G20 Interfaith Forum in Italy. Elder Dale G. Renlund of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles spoke to BYU students about finding happiness while enduring to the end. 

The Pocatello Idaho Temple open house began — the first temple open house since early 2020. In this week’s Church New podcast, BYU Professor Julianne Holt-Lunstad explored loneliness and the power of connection. Church News Editor Sarah Jane Weaver shared a lesson of understanding from a Supreme Court justice and the mother of one of the defendants she sentenced. Opening devotionals at BYU–Idaho and Ensign College included remarks by their respective presidents. 

Find links and summaries to these nine articles below.

1. President Nelson launches Spanish Instagram account to better connect with worldwide Church

To better reach Spanish-speaking members and friends around the world, President Nelson has launched an Instagram account in Spanish — the first Spanish-only social media account by a senior Church leader. On Wednesday, Sept. 15 — the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States — he posted a video, reel and story on Instagram of him speaking in Spanish. 

Read more about his first posts

2. Elder and Sister Bednar teach young adults how to find answers to their own questions — ‘ask, seek and knock’

Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Sister Susan Bednar, host a Face to Face event in the Conference Center Theater in Salt Lake City, broadcast on Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021.
Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Sister Susan Bednar, host a Face to Face event in the Conference Center Theater in Salt Lake City, broadcast on Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

During the Face to Face broadcast from the Conference Center Theater on Temple Square, Elder Bednar and his wife, Sister Susan Bednar, emphasized the pattern “ask, seek, knock” as young adults around the world shared personal experiences of finding answers to questions through the Holy Ghost. 

“We should not expect the Church as an organization to teach or tell us all the things we need to do to become devoted disciples and to endure valiantly to the end,” he told young adults worldwide during the prerecorded event on Sunday, Sept. 12. 

What Elder Bednar said about finding answers to questions

3. Elder Andersen’s reflections on Joseph Smith after visiting Church historic sites in Eastern United States

Elder Neil L. Andersen and Sister Kathy Andersen pose in front of the historical Joseph and Emma Smith home at the Priesthood Restoration Site in Oakland Township (Susquehanna), Pennsylvania, on Sunday, Aug. 29, 2021.
Elder Neil L. Andersen and Sister Kathy Andersen pose in front of the historical Joseph and Emma Smith home at the Priesthood Restoration Site in Oakland Township (Susquehanna), Pennsylvania, on Sunday, Aug. 29, 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

As Elder Andersen traveled to Latter-day Saint historic sites in the Eastern United States Aug. 27-29, he thought about the Prophet Joseph Smith and the life the early leader “lived in crescendo.”

Read Elder Andersen’s reflections and experiences at each site; plus watch a video of him teaching about tasting the fruit of the gospel

4. Believers’ ability to serve tied to religious freedom, Elder Rasband says at G20 Interfaith Forum

Elder Ronald A. Rasband, of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, talks with Imam Ahmed Tabakovic, Islamic Community of Bosnians in Italy, during the G20 Interfaith Forum in Bologna, Italy, on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021.
Elder Ronald A. Rasband, of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, talks with Imam Ahmed Tabakovic, Islamic Community of Bosnians in Italy, during the G20 Interfaith Forum in Bologna, Italy, on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Credit: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

Elder Rasband spoke about the global reach of humanitarian and service efforts of the Church and other religious organizations, and how religious freedom enables that aid, at a G20 Interfaith Forum in Bologna, Italy, on Monday, Sept. 13. The next day, Sister Eubank spoke on the power faith groups have in helping to prevent hunger through food development.

Learn more about Elder Rasband’s presentation on religious freedom, plus what he said about participating in the forum, and what Sister Eubank shared about helping to prevent hunger

5. Elder Renlund explains how doctrine of Christ and spiritual ‘sisu’ lead to ‘happily ever after’

Elder Dale G. Renlund of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles speaks during BYU campus devotional in the Marriott Center in Provo, Utah, on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021.
Elder Dale G. Renlund of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles speaks during BYU campus devotional in the Marriott Center in Provo, Utah, on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021. Credit: Jaren Wilkey, BYU

So how can individuals live “happily ever after”? Elder Renlund asked. “The road to eternal happiness depends on lifelong conversion to the truths of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. Lifelong conversion means that we endure to the end, remaining firm in our commitment to keep the covenants we have made with God — no matter what.”

What is Finnish ‘sisu’ and what he taught about how enduring to the end is more than hunkering down and gritting your teeth

6. Pocatello Idaho Temple opens its doors, offering first public look inside a temple in 590 days

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' Pocatello Idaho Temple in Pocatello, Idaho, is pictured on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Ground was broken for the temple in the spring of 2019.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Pocatello Idaho Temple in Pocatello, Idaho, is pictured on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Ground was broken for the temple in the spring of 2019. Credit: Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

For the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered the normalcy of daily life worldwide more than a year and a half ago, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has a new temple briefly open to public view.

The new Pocatello Idaho Temple began its to-the-public phase Monday, Sept. 13, with media tours led Elder Gary E. Stevenson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Sister Lesa Stevenson; and Elder Gary B. Sabin, General Authority Seventy and Temple Department assistant executive director, and his wife, Sister Valerie Sabin. Joining them were President Camille N. Johnson, Primary general president.

See photos of the Pocatello Idaho Temple’s interior and read more about what the leaders said; plus other upcoming temple open houses and dedications

7. BYU Professor Julianne Holt-Lunstad on the loneliness epidemic and the power of connection

Episode 48 of the Church News podcast features Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University, who addresses the long-term health effects of social connection.
Episode 48 of the Church News podcast features Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University, who addresses the long-term health effects of social connection. Credit: Church News graphic

After months defined by the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of people across the globe are longing for social connection. This episode of the Church News podcast features Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University, who addresses the long-term health effects of social connection.

Listen to podcast, including ways to help build relationships

8. The lesson of understanding from a Supreme Court justice and the mother of the defendant she sentenced

Sonia Sotomayor, left, President Obama's choice to replace retiring Justice David Souter, takes the oath from Chief Justice John Roberts to become the Supreme Court's first Hispanic justice and only the third woman in the court's 220-year history, in Washington, Saturday, Aug. 8, 2009. She takes the oath on a book of scriptures sent to her by a Latter-day Saint mother.
Sonia Sotomayor, left, President Obama’s choice to replace retiring Justice David Souter, takes the oath from Chief Justice John Roberts to become the Supreme Court’s first Hispanic justice and only the third woman in the court’s 220-year history, in Washington, Saturday, Aug. 8, 2009. She takes the oath on a book of scriptures sent to her by a Latter-day Saint mother. Credit: J. Scott Applewhite, Associated Press

The book of scripture U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor used for her swearing in, which she describes as “a Mormon Bible,” was given to her by the Latter-day Saint mother of a defendant in a tough case for the justice. The experience contains a sweet lesson in a world needing more bridges than walls.

Find out more about the experience

9. Opening devotionals at BYU–Idaho and Ensign College

BYU-Idaho President Henry J. Eyring speaks during a campus devotional on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021.
BYU-Idaho President Henry J. Eyring speaks during a campus devotional on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021. Credit: Screenshot from byui.edu

In the school’s opening devotional,  BYU–Idaho President Henry J. Eyring encouraged students to “stand patiently in holy places.” Ensign College President Bruce C. Kusch encouraged students to trust in God’s timing.

Read summaries of President Eyring’s and President Kusch’s messages