This week on social: A Primary talk, a lunch with Sister Oaks and an invitation to all young adults

This week on social media, Church leaders invited others to join in the Face to Face broadcast on Sunday, imparted inspiration from a recent temple dedication, and shared what they learned about “Come, Follow Me” from Primary children.

On Feb. 18, President Dallin H. Oaks issued an invitation on Facebook to watch a Face to Face event focused on the new Children and Youth program on Sunday, Feb. 23. He will be joined by his wife, Sister Kristen Oaks. The event will be broadcast at 4 p.m. MST on ChurchofJesusChrist.org, YouTube or Facebook.

“We hope you and your family will join with us as we discuss ways we can become more like Jesus Christ,” the post read.

Kristen and I will be participating in a Face to Face event about the new Children and Youth program this Sunday,…

Posted by Dallin H. Oaks on Tuesday, February 18, 2020

That same day, President Jean B. Bingham, Relief Society general president, also invited social media users to watch the Face to Face event through a video posted to her Facebook page.

Sister Bingham recently met with Sister Oaks for lunch and asked her a few questions about the upcoming Face to Face event and the Children and Youth program.

“I know that a lot of mothers will be watching and thinking about the Children and Youth program. What are some helps that you could give them to help them as they guide their children in the Children and Youth program?” Sister Bingham asked Sister Oaks in the video.

“I think the best part about this program is that everyone discovers their divine potential, and there’s no better place to discover that than at home and with people that will support you and surround you and maybe help you do those things,” Sister Oaks replied. She offered suggestions for parents such as reading scriptures in the morning with their children or setting a goal to learn more about Jesus Christ.

Face to Face on Sunday!

I had lunch with Sister Kristen Oaks the other day. And she gave me an “inside look” into what parents and youth can expect to hear at the Face 2 Face event on Sunday February 23.

Posted by Jean B. Bingham on Tuesday, February 18, 2020

On Feb. 19, Sister Michelle Craig, first counselor in the Young Women general presidency, shared a short video of her 4-year-old grandson practicing for his first Primary talk. In this post, she shared her gratitude for children who are “learning, loving, and living the words of Jesus Christ.”

Even families who have intentionally begun teaching “Come, Follow Me” in their homes might naturally fall back into old habits when life becomes busy and hard. “Don’t give up, and don’t get discouraged if your efforts lag from time to time,” Sister Craig wrote. “Being intentional about studying ‘Come, Follow Me’ individually, with our families, or with our friends will bless our lives, and we will see the promises of a living prophet fulfilled as homes are transformed into sanctuaries of faith and children learn and live the Savior’s teachings.”

Easton

A sister in my ward shared a sweet interaction she had with her 2-year-old daughter, Adi, a few weeks ago. When tucking her into bed one night, this sister asked, “Adi, what does a cow say?” Eye roll. “Moo.” What does a horse say? Another eye roll. “Neigh.” “Adi, what does Jesus say?” Immediately Adi answered, “Come, follow me!”I love Adi’s enthusiastic response! Her answer is an indication that she has probably heard this phrase repeated many times in her home. While not perfect, her family is being intentional about home-centered gospel study and studying Come, Follow Me. Like all of us, they are learning and adapting as they discover what works for their family.It’s natural to start out strong when something new is introduced and then slip back into old habits when life is busy and hard. Don’t give up, and don’t get discouraged if your efforts lag from time to time. Being intentional about studying Come, Follow Me individually, with our families, or with our friends will bless our lives, and we will see the promises of a living prophet fulfilled as homes are transformed into sanctuaries of faith and children learn and live the Savior’s teachings.This became evident to me as I watched this video of my four-year-old grandson practicing for his first talk in Primary. How grateful I am for children like Adi and like my grandson who are learning, loving, and living the words of Jesus Christ.

Posted by Michelle D. Craig on Wednesday, February 19, 2020

This past Sunday, Elder Ronald A. Rasband dedicated the Durban South Africa Temple. On Feb. 17, the next day, he shared on Instagram some of his thoughts from the memorable experience.

He had the impression that “the doctrine of Jesus Christ unites all of us — around the world — as daughters and sons of God.” Regardless of one’s look or dress, everyone on earth is one people: “the people of the Church of Jesus Christ.”

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles recently had the opportunity to speak to a group of young adults in a devotional held in Stanford University’s Memorial Church on Feb. 9. In a Feb. 15, he also addressed the young adults who follow him on social media.

He invited them to “accept our Savior’s invitation to receive Him.” Elder Holland asked that no matter their circumstances in life, that their ongoing journey follow in the footsteps in the Master. 

“Wherever you are going and however you work through your challenges in getting there, I ask you to come unto Him as the imperative first step in getting to your personal destination, in finding your individual happiness and strength, in achieving your ultimate destiny and success.”

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I recently had the chance to speak at a devotional for young adults in Palo Alto, California. I know that many of you who follow me on social media are also young adults. My primary message to them—and to you—is this: Accept our Savior’s invitation to receive Him. The wonderful thing about this invitation to receive Him, to come to Him, and to pursue the fulness of His stature, is that anybody can do it; everybody can do it. . Consider this comment by the remarkable Dietrich Bonhoeffer, he who died in a prison camp while opposing the Nazi regime in his beloved Germany. Said he, we must “[follow] Christ with every ounce of [our] being in every moment, in every part of [our lives]. … Christ must be brought into every square inch of the world and [our] culture. … [Our] faith must be shining and bright and pure and robust” (Eric Metaxas, “Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy,” 264–65). I dearly plead for faith that is “shining and bright and pure and robust,” for Christ to “be brought into every square inch of our culture.” For the stature of Christ to be at full measure in our lives. . Wherever you live, whatever your joys or sorrows, however young or old you may be, I am asking that your ongoing journey follow in the footsteps of the Master. Wherever you are going and however you work through your challenges in getting there, I ask you to come unto Him as the imperative first step in getting to your personal destination, in finding your individual happiness and strength, in achieving your ultimate destiny and success. All of that can be yours if the answer to the question “Where goest thou?” is “Wherever you are, Lord.”

A post shared by Jeffrey R. Holland (@jeffreyrholland) on

On Feb. 19, Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles received the George Washington Honor Medal at an event hosted by the Utah chapter of the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge.

In an Instagram post the next day, Elder Christofferson shared how it caused him to think more about how grateful he is to be a citizen of the United States “and to be blessed by the opportunities and freedoms we are offered in this country.”

Everyone has a part to play in religious freedom, he wrote. “Take a stand for religious freedom. Teach your families the benefits of religion in your nation and society. Teach them to respect the faith of all people, even those with very different beliefs. And teach them that respecting religious freedom at times means tolerating religious beliefs and practices we disagree with.”