This week on social: Eyesight, prayer and promised blessings

On social media this week, Church leaders wrote about their recent addresses in general conference and devotionals, finding peace in Christ and promised blessings from the Lord through prophets.

On Oct. 25, Elder Dale G. Renlund of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles wrote about the dangers of making simple things complex.

“When we make complex that which is simple, we probably suffer from ‘hyperopia’ (far-sightedness) in that important things that are close to us become blurred,” he said.

“The simplicity of the doctrine of Christ can serve as the corrective lenses to our spiritual ‘myopia’ or ‘hyperopia.’”

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The Old Testament prophet Isaiah warned of tactics that would be used in these latter days to confuse Heavenly Father’s children. We are cautioned, “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!” (Isaiah 5:20). An equally worrisome couplet for our time would be, “Woe unto them that make complex that which is simple.” The things of Christ are straightforward, requiring small and simple actions on our part. When we make complex that which is simple, we probably suffer from “hyperopia” (far-sightedness) in that important things that are close to us become blurred. I suspect this is an equally worrisome disease as “myopia” (near-sightedness; see Russell M. Nelson, “Let God Prevail,” Oct. 2020 general conference), when the big picture is blurred. With “hyperopia” we sometimes fail to appreciate that which is closest to us. Whether we are suffering from “myopia” or “hyperopia,” wise medical professionals can prescribe corrective lenses that help us to see clearly. The simplicity of the doctrine of Christ can serve as the corrective lenses to our spiritual “myopia” or “hyperopia.” As we exercise and strengthen our faith, recognize simple changes we need to make in our lives, partake of the sacrament, and listen carefully to the direction of the Holy Ghost, our vision can be just right. It’s simple, not complex.

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In an eyesight-related post on Oct. 26, Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles compared his recent experience with lens replacement surgery to taking a step on the Lord’s path.

“The Savior is the Master Healer. His divine sacrifice and love for us are the path to regain the clear and true vision of things as they really are,” he wrote.

On Oct. 28, President Russell M. Nelson, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Tweeted an excerpt from one of his general conference addresses from October 2020, “Let God Prevail.

President Dallin H. Oaks, first counselor in the First Presidency, shared on social media on Oct. 27 about the message he gave this week at BYU calling to “root out” racism and unite in Christ.

“Only the gospel of Jesus Christ can unite and bring peace to people of all races and nationalities,” he wrote.

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Today at Brigham Young University I shared a message about important issues of our day, including overcoming racism. Personal attitudes and official practices of racism are not consistent with the revealed word of God. We know that God created all mortals, and we are all children of God. The challenge of racism is not a new one, but recent events have precipitated the current discussion. The shocking police-produced death of George Floyd in Minnesota last May was surely a trigger for nationwide protests in the United States, whose momentum was carried forward under the message of “Black Lives Matter.” Of course Black lives matter! That is an eternal truth all reasonable people should support. Dear friends, let us all heed President @russellmnelson’s call to repent, to change, and to improve. Only the gospel of Jesus Christ can unite and bring peace to people of all races and nationalities. We who believe in that gospel—whatever our origins—must unite in love of each other and of our Savior, Jesus Christ. I invite you to read about my full remarks at the link in my bio.

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In an Oct. 25 Facebook post, Young Women General President Bonnie H. Cordon wrote about the upheaval she experienced as a young woman when her parents were called by the Church to serve in Portugal.

“For the first time in my life I really needed to feel peace,” she wrote. “My prayers became very specific and — eventually — a new hope and light began to grow.”

On Oct. 26, President M. Russell Ballard, Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, recounted an experience he had with prayer recently, a story he also shared as part of his most recent general conference address.

“The world’s current chaotic situation may seem daunting as we consider the multitude of issues and challenges,” he said. “But it is my fervent testimony that if we will pray and ask Heavenly Father for needed blessings and guidance, we will come to know how we can bless our families, neighbors, communities, and even the countries in which we live.”

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I know the power of prayer by my own experience. Recently I was alone in my office. I had just gone through a medical procedure on my hand. It was black and blue, swollen, and it was painful. As I sat at my desk, I could not focus on important and critical matters because I was distracted by this pain. I knelt in prayer and asked the Lord to help me focus so I could accomplish my work. I stood and returned to the pile of papers on my desk. Almost immediately, clarity and focus came to my mind, and I was able to complete the pressing matters before me. The world’s current chaotic situation may seem daunting as we consider the multitude of issues and challenges. But it is my fervent testimony that if we will pray and ask Heavenly Father for needed blessings and guidance, we will come to know how we can bless our families, neighbors, communities, and even the countries in which we live.

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President Henry B. Eyring, second counselor in the First Presidency, wrote a social media post on Oct. 29 about President Nelson’s promise from the October 2018 general conference regarding using the correct name of the Church.

He invited readers to share the blessings they’ve experienced from using the correct name of the Lord’s Church in the comments.

In an Oct. 29 social media post, Elder Gary E. Stevenson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles posted an excerpt from his most recent general conference address on Twitter.

On Oct. 28, Elder Quentin L. Cook of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles wrote about those who feel that important blessings have been denied them.

He echoed the words of President Lorenzo Snow, who said that “if a young man or a young woman has no opportunity of getting married, and they live faithful lives up to the time of their death, they will have all the blessings, exaltation, and glory that any man or woman will have who had this opportunity and improved it.”

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I often think of those of you who may feel that important blessings have been denied to you in this life. It is important to remember that being righteous is not dependent on each of us having every blessing in our lives at this time. We may not be married or blessed with children or have other desired blessings now. But the Lord has promised that the righteous who are faithful “may dwell with God in a state of never-ending happiness,” (Mosiah 2:41). Perhaps you will find comfort in the words of President Lorenzo Snow, as I have: “There is no Latter-day Saint who dies after having lived a faithful life who will lose anything because of having failed to do certain things when opportunities were not furnished him or her. “In other words, if a young man or a young woman has no opportunity of getting married, and they live faithful lives up to the time of their death, they will have all the blessings, exaltation, and glory that any man or woman will have who had this opportunity and improved it. That is sure and positive,” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Lorenzo Snow [2012], 130). I know that those words are true. I pray that you may feel the truth of this promise as I have.

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Elder Ulisses Soares of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles Tweeted a portion of his most recent general conference address on Oct. 27.

In an Oct. 30 social media post, Elder Ronald A. Rasband of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles wrote about his recent opportunity to address students at BYU–Hawaii with his wife, Sister Melanie Rasband.

“Christ’s influence, imprint, and reach are all encompassing. He is there when we falter and when we press forward,” he said.