This week on social: 9/11 Day of Service, remembering ‘not the terror but the ability to come together’

Sister Sharon Eubank, first counselor in the Relief Society general presidency, shared a video in which she discusses the 9/11 National Day of Service, and encouraged her followers to “do something strong that you feel strongly about,” to “makes your community better.”

“The founders of the 9/11 Day of Service want people to remember not the terror but the ability to come together,” she said in the video. “Many of us remember Sept. 11, 2001, as a day of fear and trauma, but may we also remember how we came together to comfort and lift each other.”

Young Men General President Steven J. Lund posted a picture of a woman named Amy, a crossing guard, dressed up as a lobster. Amy wears a different costume each day, knows the name of all the children and comforts them when they’re having a rough morning.

“I don’t know that the Savior ever helped children cross to school dressed as a lobster, but I guarantee that He loves Amy for doing so,” President Lund said. “If He were there, He would know their names, and He would befriend them like she is.”

“Professional women shouldn’t disqualify themselves from Church service, because the Lord doesn’t disqualify them,” Primary General President Camille N. Johnson wrote in a social media post. “Whatever you choose to do, or need to do, to take care of your family, the Lord will guide you.” 

President Johnson worked as a lawyer for 30 years, and in her post, she explained how she balanced her family, Church service and professional career during that time.

In a recent devotional at the Provo Missionary Training Center, Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles pointed out what the Savior did when He had limited time to be with people — “He emphasized priesthood authority, covenants and ordinances.”

“Priesthood ordinances, administered by the authority of God, open heavenly portals,” he wrote in a social media post. 

When Sister Reyna Isabel Aburto, second counselor in the Relief Society general presidency, was 15 years old, there was civil unrest and violence in her native country of Nicaragua. 

“I remember thinking, ‘Why is this happening? Why doesn’t God stop this?’” she wrote in a social media post. 

She bore witness that Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ provide strength to overcome challenges, as well as “the power to be a hope and a light for others — to have the sensitivity that we gain when we suffer so that we can help other people.”

Sister Aburto also shared five lessons that she learned when her daughter was experiencing mental health challenges over the space of a few years. She also linked mental health resources in her stories, as September is suicide prevention awareness month.

Elder Ronald A. Rasband of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles shared a pattern to follow when faced with questions “important to your spiritual journey,” and promised that it will lead to “greater faith in the Savior, greater understanding of His gospel, and greater peace.”

Sister Michelle D. Craig, first counselor in the Young Women general presidency, wrote a social media post about Sunday church attendance. She encouraged her social media followers, instead of “focusing solely on what we are getting out of church,” to “prayerfully ponder what we can and need to give as well.”

“You can’t tell God how and when He responds to our prayers,” Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles said in the latest video in the #HearHim series, which he shared on his social media pages Sep. 9.

Brother Brad R. Wilcox, second counselor in the Young Men general presidency, shared the story of a young man named Ryland who acted as the model for the stained glass window in the Rome Italy Temple Visitors’ Center.

“Like the boy in the window, Ryland finally turned to the Savior, grasped His extended hand, and felt the grace and healing He offers,” Brother Wilcox wrote.

“Any ounce of effort we make to share the Savior’s love with those around us is never done in vain,” wrote Relief Society General President Jean B. Bingham in a social media post. 

The strength, peace and courage needed to move ahead can be found by turning to the Savior, she said.