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Latter-day Saint with Down syndrome has become a ‘dancing’ usher at Texas Rangers home games

Hannah Speirs was recently featured in an interview with the NBC affiliate in Dallas/Fort Worth area

A Latter-day Saint with special needs has become a fan favorite at home games for the Texas Rangers.

Hannah Speirs, who has Down syndrome, was hired as an usher for Rangers’ games at Globe Life Field 12 years ago.

What she brought to the job without being asked are her dance moves.

At different breaks during the game, Speirs will begin dancing to entertain fans. Her performances are often played on the stadium’s Jumbotron.

Latter-day Saint Hannah Speirs watches video of herself dancing at a Texas Rangers baseball game.
Latter-day Saint Hannah Speirs watches video of herself dancing at a Texas Rangers baseball game during a media interview. | NBC Screenshot

“I love to do dancing,” she said in an interview with NBC. “I make them happy. They love my dance moves I do ... because I make them [feel] joy.”

A co-worker made Speirs her own baseball cards so she could share them with fans. Her name on the card is “Dancing Queen Hannah.”

Speirs works almost all home games except for those on Sunday so she can attend worship services of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Arlington with her family.

“I have a dream job,” she said.

Speirs said she was excited to take part in the first two games of the World Series between the Rangers and the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Speirs was recently featured in an interview with the NBC affiliate in the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, area. Read the entire article here.

Speirs was also featured in an article on churchofjesuschristinnorthtexas.org.

“She lights up the ballpark with her infectious smile and incredible dance moves,” said Lisa Baggett, an employee with the Rangers.

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