Muslims, Latter-day Saints break fast at Church meetinghouse during interfaith event

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Jamiyah Singapore organized a community Iftar held on May 27, 2019, at the Church’s meetinghouse — a historic occasion, as it was their first time breaking the fast in a Christian house of worship.

This community event was led by Elder David F. Evans, Asia Area President of the Church, and Dr. Mohd Hasbi bin Abu Baker, president of Jamiyah Singapore. Seven hundred people were involved with the Iftar and government officials, diplomats, grassroots leaders and religious leaders of various faiths in Singapore came to hear from speakers and participate in the event.

“If we seek understanding and take time to look closely, there are many things that can and do bring us together,” Elder Evans told Newsroom. “When observed with charity and understanding, these intersections of faith, practice, and custom can and will bring a feeling of unity and purpose.”

Government officials, diplomats, grassroots leaders and religious leaders from various faiths in Singapore attended a historic Iftar on May 27, 2019.
Government officials, diplomats, grassroots leaders and religious leaders from various faiths in Singapore attended a historic Iftar on May 27, 2019.

Dr. Mohd Hasbi addressed the urgent need to strengthen interfaith collaboration and action. Respecting the principle of unity in diversity, regardless of race, nationality and religion will help to mitigate how often crimes and violent acts occur.

Mr. S Iswaran, Minister for Communications and Information, and Melvin Young, a member of Parliament, were in attendance and took the opportunity to share their thoughts. They both expressed their satisfaction in and appreciation for the impact of the interfaith harmony initiatives.

This event, built on the common foundation of fasting, is an inspiring display of a desire and effort to collaborate with and respect each other within our diversity. The fast that Church members participate in once a month is very similar to the Muslim practice of fasting during the month of Ramadan. Both faiths dedicate their fast to be closer to God and to donate money to serve those in need.

Members of the Church in Singapore have partnered with Jamiyah Singapore to work on several service projects in the past and have built great relationships in their community. They hope to reach out to other faiths and inspire more interfaith collaboration and collective action.

Read the full story on Newsroom.