Menu
Archives

Uniquely United

Divided by language and tradition, neighbors united by Helsinki temple

ESPOO, Finland — They didn't understand each other's language, and they didn't fully understand each other's traditions, but for a few, brief shining moments, the 7,000 Church members gathered for the cultural program from the five nations in the Helsinki Finland Temple district were uniquely united in spirit.

They cheered like they were greatest friends.

Dressed in colorful tradtiional customs, youth beat drums to provide cadence for adults to dance.
Dressed in colorful tradtiional customs, youth beat drums to provide cadence for adults to dance. | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle

Members from the nations of Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Finland had never met each other until the dress rehearsal the night before the Oct. 21 performance.

But come performance time, from the first Russian dance to the last chorus of "Finlandia," members throughout the LansiAuto Areena clapped spontaneously.

Since the temple was announced in 2000, organizers of the cultural event wished to emphasize the unique power of the temple to unify diverse and sometimes hostile nations.

The performance opened with a scene from the ancient days of the Tower of Babel. In a scene of raucous dancing and riotous living, the tower is destroyed. In the aftermath, the confusion of tongues divides the people.

The theme of the cultural event was introduced by two women, presumably former friends, who sang a duet lamenting their challenge of finding truth in life without being able to communicate.

"Our paths will now part," they sang, "how can I find heaven?"

As the program progressed, this duet expanded to include a singer from each culture, singing the same lament in her language.

The music was composed by Irmeli Tuisku and the lyrics by Sirpa Happonen of the Hyvinkaa Ward. Music was arranged by Noora Lehtinen.

The Russian members followed the opening scene with a colorful show that demonstrated their rich heritage of song and dance. Using several hundred performers, they told a love story and how the couple was reunited after being divided by war.

Russian dancer
Russian dancer | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle

Something about Russian music started the toe tapping. No sooner were the first notes of a playful folk song struck on the accordion than the audience clapped in cadence.

Each country followed in turn, the Latvians dressed in white, the Estonians in bright native costume, then the Lithuanians and Finnish. Each group drew applause and appreciation from their fellow temple district members.

With each country divided and separate, an image of the Helsinki temple was projected on a background screen. The cast of performers returned to the stage dressed in white clothes, signifying that the temple heals differences and unifies diversity.

United, the congregation and cast joined in singing "Finlandia," stirring patriotic music by Finnish composer Jean Sibelius.

Whatever the differences of the past, the temple unifies.

                                girls dance
girls dance | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle
Ladies and their partners perform traditional Lithuanian dance.
Ladies and their partners perform traditional Lithuanian dance. | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle
Russian dancer during courtship of couple, flowing beautiful robes depict rich, colorful Russian his
Russian dancer during courtship of couple, flowing beautiful robes depict rich, colorful Russian history. | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle
girls dance traditional dance of Finland
girls dance traditional dance of Finland | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle
music and dancing as was known in a popular market many years ago in Finland.
music and dancing as was known in a popular market many years ago in Finland. | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle
traditional dance.
traditional dance. | Photo by Shaun D. Stahle

E-mail to: shaun@desnews.com

Newsletters
Subscribe for free and get daily or weekly updates straight to your inbox
The three things you need to know everyday
Highlights from the last week to keep you informed

New headstones, acquired by the Barrhead Ward in partnership with Family Community Support Services, will permanently preserve the memory of Black pioneers in Campsie, Alberta. Local Latter-day Saints began the restoration of this site in 1997 in honor of Pioneer Heritage Service Day.

These new mission presidents and companions have been called to serve by the First Presidency. They will begin their service in July.

$10.4 million was donated through the 2023 Giving Machines in 61 locations across seven countries.

Lynne M. Jackson is the great-great-granddaughter of Dred and Harriet Scott, who were denied their freedom by the Supreme Court in 1857.

Members of the Relief Society general presidency share their excitement for the upcoming event celebrating the anniversary — and purpose — of Relief Society.

Feb. 29 letter also gives directives that only sacrament services be held on Easter Sunday.