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Let your light shine, LDS Church members told during general conference

Credit: Stacie Scott, Deseret News
Credit: Scott G Winterton, Deseret News
Credit: Scott G Winterton, Deseret News
Credit: Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

Latter-day Saints gathered in the Conference Center in downtown Salt Lake City — and in other locations across the globe — sustained three new apostles during the Church’s 185th Semiannual General Conference on Oct. 3.

President Thomas S. Monson extended a welcome to the newly called apostles, Elder Ronald A. Rasband, Elder Gary E. Stevens and Elder Dale G. Renlund, during the Sunday morning session. "These are men dedicated to the work of the Lord. They are well qualified to fill the important positions to which they have been called," he said. (Please see article on this page highlighting a press conference with the new apostles.)

During the conference — the last five sessions of which were held Oct. 3-4 — more than 120,000 Church members received counsel and direction from Church leaders and officers. (The first session of conference, the General Women’s Session, held Sept. 27, was reported in the Church News for the week of Oct. 4.) The conference's sessions were translated and sent to 100 countries via television, radio, satellite and Internet broadcasts.

President Monson presided at the conference and spoke in two of the six sessions held over the weekend of Oct. 3-4. His counselors in the First Presidency, President Henry B. Eyring and President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, took turns conducting the sessions.

President Monson began his Sunday morning talk by paying tribute to his late friends and fellow apostles — President Boyd K. Packer, Elder L. Tom Perry and Elder Richard G. Scott. "They have returned to their heavenly home," he said. "We miss them. How grateful we are for their examples of Christlike love and for the inspired teachings they have left to all of us."

Then, to the general membership of the Church, he said: "To each of you I say that you are a son or daughter of our Heavenly Father. You have come from His presence to live on this earth for a season, to reflect the Savior's love and teachings and to bravely let your light shine for all to see."

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir, under the direction of Mack Wilberg and Ryan Murphy, provided music for three sessions of conference. A Primary Choir from stakes in Riverton, Utah, provided music for the Saturday afternoon session. A Primary, Young Women and Relief Society choir from southern Cache Valley provided the music for the meeting. A father/son choir from stakes in Orem, Utah, provided music for the General Priesthood Session.

Clay Christiansen, Richard Elliott, Andrew Unsworth, Linda Margetts and Bonnie Goodliffe accompanied the choirs on the organ.

During conference, Elder Koichi Aoyagi, Elder Bruce A. Carlson and Elder Don R. Clarke were released as General Authority Seventies and granted emeritus status. (Please see biographies of the Church leaders on page 2.) In addition, Elder Serhii A. Kovalov was released as an Area Seventy.

sarah@deseretnews.com @SJW_ChurchNews

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