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Open house for Baton Rouge temple begins. See what the interior looks like

The celestial room in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
A sealing room in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
Detailed décor in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The bride’s room in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The baptistry in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
Detailed décor in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
Paintings depicting Jesus Christ in various biblical settings are located throughout the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The statue of angel Moroni, an ancient Book of Mormon prophet, atop the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The recommend desk in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
Detailed décor on the exterior of the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The celestial room in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
A waiting area in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
Detailed décor in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The recommend desk in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
Detailed décor on the exterior of the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
An instruction room in the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
Detailed décor on the exterior of the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
The Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

Welcoming the public to tour the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple, the open house for the newly renovated temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will be held beginning Saturday, Oct. 26, through Saturday, Nov. 2.

Hours for the open house tours are Monday through Thursday from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., with no tours on Sunday. No reservations for the tours are required.

The temple will be rededicated on Sunday, Nov. 17, by Elder Quentin L. Cook of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Following the dedication, the temple will reopen for patrons on Saturday, Nov. 23.

The Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple.
The Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. | Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

Dedicated in 2000, the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple was the 94th operating temple of the Church and was originally built as part of the series of small temples designed in the early 2000s under the direction of President Gordon B. Hinckley.

Renovation work on the temple, which is the only temple in Louisiana and is attended by members in both Louisiana and Mississippi, began in January 2018. During the nearly two-year renovation, the temple entrance and exterior were redesigned and the steeple was raised by 10 feet. New art glass windows featuring shell and magnolia flower motifs were also added during the renovation, and the exterior stone was updated from a white marble to a beige-colored limestone. Throughout the temple’s interior, the color scheme of green, blue, coral and cream highlight native flora and complement the art glass.

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