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See these new interior photos of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple before the open house begins

The celestial room in the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
The grounds and temple of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple site. MATTHEW T REIER
The recommend desk in the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
The celestial room in the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
An ordinance room in the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. Credit: Intellectual Reserve, Inc.
A sealing room in the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
A chandelier from the interior of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
Artistic detail from the interior of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
Glass-art details from the interior of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
The Fortaleza Brazil Temple exterior and grounds. MATTHEW T REIER
The entrance of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER
The Fortaleza Brazil Temple. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The baptistry of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. MATTHEW T REIER

The Fortaleza Brazil Temple — which will become the Church's 164th operating temple worldwide and seventh in Brazil — is opening its doors to the public beginning Saturday, April 27.

The temple's open house runs from April 27 through May 18, excluding Sundays. The temple will be dedicated on Sunday, June 2; a youth devotional will be held the evening prior to the dedication on June 1.

With a single domed spire topped by a gold-plate statue of the Angel Moroni, the temple stands over 100 feet tall and sits on a gently rising slope overlooking the city. The exterior of the temple is Branco Ceara granite. In the interior, motifs featuring Brazilian orchids and trailing vines are used among the glass art, carpets, painting and woodwork.

The temple grounds, which include a meetinghouse and apartments for those serving in the temple, are located in an area known as Avenida Santos Dumont in Forteleza, the capital city of the Brazilian state of Ceara.

The grounds and temple of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple site.
The grounds and temple of the Fortaleza Brazil Temple site. | MATTHEW T REIER

President Thomas S. Monson announced the Fortaleza Brazil Temple during general conference in October 2009. Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles presided over the Nov. 15, 2011, groundbreaking at the temple site.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' presence in Brazil dates back to 1929; in the time since, the membership in the country has grown to nearly 1.4 million.

Brazil is home to six operating temples, the first in the country and all of South America being the Sao Paulo Brazil Temple, dedicated in 1978. Other operating temples are located in Campinas, Curitiba, Manaus, Porto Alegre and Recife. An additional temple in Rio de Janeiro is under construction, with three more announced for Belem, Brasilia and Salvador.

In November 2018, the Church announced that Paulo Renato Grahl and his wife, Zuleika Morais Grahl would serve as the first temple president and matron for the new temple. President Grahl is a former Area Seventy.

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