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See photographs of the inside of the Washington D.C. Temple

The Washington D.C.Temple in Kensington, Maryland on Sunday, April 17, 2022. Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
The Washington D.C.Temple in Kensington, Maryland on Sunday, April 17, 2022. Credit: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
The domed oval and pointed arch motifs culminate in the Celestial Room of the Washington D.C. Temple. Entering this sacred space symbolizes the ultimate progression one can achieve toward heaven itself. The newly added Austrian-crafted crystal chandelier Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
A sitting area inside the Washington D.C. Temple, with the grand staircase and stained glass wall in the background. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The reception desk in the foyer of the Washington D.C. Temple is shown in July 2021. This is where devout Latter-day Saints enter the temple. The refurbished art glass behind the desk now has LED backlighting to showcase the depiction of the Tree of Life Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Modern design furnishings accompany a custom geometric-patterned rug and white marble flooring in the windowed bridge of the Washington D.C. Temple and is shown in July 2021. Crossing the bridge from the reception desk into the temple itself suggests a de Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Modern design furnishings accompany a custom geometric-patterned rug and white marble flooring in the windowed bridge of the Washington D.C. Temple is shown in July 2021. Crossing the bridge from the reception desk into the temple itself suggests a depart Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Entering the domed, oval rotunda of the Washington D.C. Temple. The rotunda features African anegre and maple hardwood and mid-century modern furnishings and is shown in April 2022. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Original artwork portraying the Savior’s return in His glory accompanied by heralding angels is the focus in the domed oval-shaped rotunda of the Washington D.C. Temple and is shown in April 2022. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The unique domed oval design of the Washington D.C. Temple rotunda features African anegre and maple hardwood and mid-century modern furnishings, as shown in April 2022. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
One of six instruction rooms in the Washington D.C. Temple is shown in July 2021. This is where devout Latter-day Saints learn about God’s creation, the purpose of life, and how to become more like Him and His Son, Jesus Christ. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The brides’ room inside the Washington D.C. Temple features a cherry blossom-patterned rug, crystal sconces and chandelier and is shown in July 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The baptistry in the Washington D.C. Temple is shown in July 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The baptismal font in the Washington D.C. Temple is shouldered by oxen, representing the 12 tribes of Israel, made of cast terrazzo. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Washington D.C. Temple’s stained glass windows that span the east and west towers have been refurbished. Each piece of colored glass was removed, cleaned and reinstalled in updated, weather-insulated frames — by hand. The work was completed by the sam Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The staircase, backlit by stained glass, spans the length of the east and west towers of the Washington D.C. Temple and is shown in July 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The domed oval and pointed arch motifs culminate in the celestial room of the Washington D.C. Temple. Entering this sacred space symbolizes the ultimate progression one can achieve toward heaven itself. The newly added Austrian-crafted crystal chandelier Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The celestial room inside the renovated Washington D.C. Temple features gold-leaf-adorned walls, a central crystal chandelier supported by 12 smaller chandeliers in individual pointed-arch alcoves and modern design furnishings and is shown in July 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The assembly room in the Washington D.C. Temple in July 2021. This room is reminiscent of temples of the 19th century. In this room, senior leaders of the Church meet with local leadership to discuss Church matters. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The doors of the celestial room inside the renovated Washington D.C. Temple feature brass escutcheons engraved with the image of the temple and shaped like the temple’s footprint. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
One of 10 sealing rooms inside the Washington D.C. Temple, shown in July 2021. A central crystal chandelier augments the domed oval motif prevalent in many areas of the temple. Here, marriages are performed that unite couples and their families forever. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The chapel inside the Washington D.C. Temple in January 2022. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Washington D.C.Temple in Kensington, Maryland on Sunday, April 17, 2022. Credit: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
Motorists drive on the Capital Beltway with a view of the Washington D.C.Temple in Kensington, Maryland on Sunday, April 17, 2022. Credit: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
The Washington D.C.Temple in Kensington, Maryland on Sunday, April 17, 2022. Tours continue for the national and local media. Credit: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
The Washington D.C. temple’s exterior cladding is Alabama white marble, quarried in Sylacauga, Alabama. This quarry closed shortly after the temple was completed in 1974. The quarry reopened just before the renovation started in 2018. The unique colored m Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Aerial view of the Washington D.C. Temple during construction in the early 1970s. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Artist’s rendering of the Washington D.C. Temple. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Site plan and elevations of original concept of the Washington D.C. Temple. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Crews prepare to install the angel Moroni on the Washington D.C. Temple in the 1970s. The statue symbolizes the restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Washington D.C. Temple during construction in the early 1970s. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Washington D.C. Temple during construction in the early 1970s. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Site plan and elevations of original concept of the Washington D.C. Temple. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Site plan and elevations of original concept of the Washington D.C. Temple, drawn Feb. 10, 1969. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The early stages of construction of the Washington D.C. Temple in the early 1970s. The Church broke ground for the temple in 1968. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Original plans for the second floor of the Washington D.C. Temple. Like the Salt Lake Utah Temple, the Washington D.C. Temple has six towers and spires. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
An artist’s watercolor rendering of the Washington D.C. Temple. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
This team of architects was assembled to design the Washington D.C. Temple. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Groundbreaking ceremony of the Washington D.C. Temple in 1968. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Groundbreaking ceremony of the Washington D.C. Temple in 1968. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
An artist’s rendering of the grand staircase and stained glass window inside the Washington D.C. Temple. This feature runs the length of the east and west towers. The colored glass is illuminated at night and can be seen from the Capital Beltway. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Crews form tower walls for the Washington D.C. Temple on Jan. 14, 1972. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The exterior bronze door of the Washington D.C. Temple features bronze medallions depicting the earth, moon and other familiar constellations to represent eternity. This photo was taken in 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The gardens of the Washington D.C. Temple feature plants and trees to complement the native foliage and wooded areas surrounding the temple. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

KENSINGTON, Maryland — As hundreds of local and national journalists gathered on the grounds of the Washington D.C. Temple on Monday, April 18, leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints released the first photographs of the renovated edifice.

Months after the originally planned reopening of the Washington D.C. Temple was delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic, journalists converged on the temple for the first of three media events in the temple visitors’ center. Elder David A. Bednar and Elder Gerrit W. Gong of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles were on site to give tours of the iconic temple and answer any questions.

In an exclusive national interview with Ed O’Keefe of CBS News which aired on Easter morning, Elder Bednar called the temple “a place of light, of peace.”

The baptistry in the Washington D.C. Temple is shown in July 2021.
The baptistry in the Washington D.C. Temple is shown in July 2021. | Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Anne Golightly, chair of public affairs for the local Washington D.C. Temple open house committee, said that Washington’s global community has always had great interest in the sacred building.

“Nearly everyone who hears about the opportunity to come and see the inside of this temple is enthusiastic and willing to make time in their busy schedules,” she said. 

“We want to share with our neighbors and friends the feelings we have about this special place of peace. To me, it’s a refuge in the midst of a storm, and everyone needs one of those. I know they will catch a bit of that peace when they come.“

In this global area where cultures, ideas and politics intersect, the temple has attracted the attention of millions driving the Capital Beltway for five decades.

An open house for the temple will be held April 28 through June 11, 2022, except for Sundays — marking the first time the public will be able to tour the temple since a similar open house just prior to its 1974 dedication. 

The open house will highlight the iconic temple, the grounds and the temple visitors’ center. Open house ticket information is available at dctemple.org.

Read more: Reverse Open House Series — How the Washington D.C. Temple open house inspired visits to other faiths’ sacred sites, events

Crews prepare to install the angel Moroni on the Washington D.C. Temple in the 1970s. The statue symbolizes the restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ.
Crews prepare to install the angel Moroni on the Washington D.C. Temple in the 1970s. The statue symbolizes the restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ. | Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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