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See a map of the Church’s 20-plus historic sites in the U.S.

The Church has more than two dozen historic sites across the U.S. Credit: Aaron Thorup, Church News
The Joseph Smith Birthplace Memorial in Sharon, Vt., on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019. Credit: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
Each year, about 150,000 people visit the Sacred Grove in Palmyra, N.Y., where Joseph Smith had the First Vision. Photo by Kenneth Mays Credit: Kenneth Mays
This view shows the Smith Manchester frame home looking from south to north. Construction of the home was undertaken by Alvin Smith, older brother of the Prophet Joseph. Alvin died unexpectedly in November 1823 before the home was completed. There is a tradition that the grieving Smith family planted a tree near the home in memory of Alvin. Though it is not known with certainty, the large tree to the right of the home may be that tree. It is usually referred to as the “Alvin Tree.” Robert Parrott, a forestry specialist who has contracted with the church to maintain the nearby Sacred Grove and Hill Cumorah for more than a decade, says that the “Alvin Tree” is old enough to have been the one planted in Alvin’s honor. More specifically, he estimates that the late 1820s is a realistic date for when that tree may have started growing. In any event, by referring to the tree as the “Alvin Tree,” the memory of the Prophet’s upright brother is perpetuated. Credit:Kenneth Mays Credit: Kenneth Mays
The rebuilt home of Joseph and Emma Smith shown in 2018 at the Priesthood Restoration Site in Oakland Township, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. Credit: Kenneth Mays
20090325 The rebuilding of the home of Peter Whitmer Sr. was originally the idea and proposal of then-Elder Gordon B. Hinckley. Credit: Kenneth Mays
The Newel K. Whitney store in Kirtland, Ohio, is presumably where Joseph Smith received Doctrine and Covenants Section 87, on Christmas Day. Credit: Kenneth Mays
The N.K. Whitney & Co. Store in Kirtland, Ohio, is shown in September 2020. Newel K. Whitney built the store in 1826. It later served as a post office, bishop's storehouse and early Church headquarters. Credit: Kenneth Mays
A group on a wagon ride goes past the post office in historic Nauvoo. Wagon rides are free in Navuoo. Photo by Kenneth Mays Credit: Kenneth Mays
Looking out over Adam-ondi-Ahman in Missouri. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
A statue of Joseph and Hyrum Smith is outside of Carthage Jail, where the brothers were killed on June 27, 1844. Credit: Jeffrey Allred, Deseret News Archives
The Mormon Trail Center at Winter Quarters in Omaha, Nebraska. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Site of the Liberty Jail, where Joseph Smith and others spent Christmas 1838. Credit: Kenneth Mays
20180722 Reconstructed cutaway of the Liberty Jail, where Joseph Smith and others spent Christmas 1838. Credit: Kenneth Mays
The Beehive House in Salt Lake City on Monday, Aug. 2, 2021. The Beehive House reopened to the public Monday after an extended closure due to COVID-19. Credit: Spenser Heaps, Deseret News
The historic Bear Lake Stake Tabernacle. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The walls of volcanic rock are original to Cove Fort, built in 1876. Kenneth Mays
The exterior of the Brigham Young Winter Home and Office in St. George, Utah. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Hamblin Home in Santa Clara, Utah. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Mormon Battalion Center at San Diego, California. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

From Vermont to California, there are more than two dozen Church-owned historic sites in the United States. 

Many of the sites are connected to early events of the Church, including Joseph Smith’s birthplace; his family’s home in upstate New York near the Sacred Grove, where Joseph Smith prayed to know which church to join and was visited by Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ; the Whitmer Farm, near Fayette, New York, where the Church was organized; the Priesthood Restoration Site in Pennsylvania; and the pioneer communities in Kirtland, Ohio, and Nauvoo, Illinois. Many have visitors’ centers, such as the Mormon Trail Center at Historic Winter Quarters in Omaha, Nebraska, and the Mormon Battalion Historic Site in San Diego, California, that help share the site’s significance. 

The sites have been reopened to the public for in-person visits and many also have virtual tours available. See history.churchofjesuschrist.org/landing/historic-sites for information on what is available at the site, what to expect when visiting and also on scheduling a virtual tour.

The Church has more than two dozen historic sites across the U.S.
The Church has more than two dozen historic sites across the U.S. | Credit: Aaron Thorup, Church News

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