In case you missed it: President Oaks honored, Elder Holland and Sister Eubank on supporting religious expression for refugees, plus 7 other stories

During the week of June 27-July 3, President Dallin H. Oaks, first counselor in the First Presidency, was honored at the Freedom Awards Gala. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and Sister Sharon Eubank, president of Latter-day Saint Charities and first counselor in the Relief Society general presidency, participated virtually in the 2021 AMAR Windsor Dialogue Conference in England about supporting religious expression for refugees.

Elder Quentin L. Cook of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles presented alongside prominent faith leaders at the Notre Dame Religious Liberty Summit. Sister Reyna Isabel Aburto, second counselor in the Relief Society general presidency, joined the Church News podcast to discuss mental and emotional health and the power of turning to the Savior for comfort.

Missionary training centers in New Zealand and Ghana reopened this week, and the Family History Library in downtown Salt Lake City is preparing to reopen. Church members in the Philippines are celebrating the 60th anniversary of missionary work there.

The remains of a Latter-day Saint sailor who died at Pearl Harbor were identified and he was buried in Shelley, Idaho. A 15-year-old Latter-day Saint soccer star, Olivia Moultrie, is the youngest player to the sign with a National Women’s Soccer League squad.

Find links and read summaries of these nine article below.

1. President Oaks honored for lifelong support of God, family, freedom and country

President Dallin H. Oaks of the First Presidency greets attendees at the Freedom Awards Gala, an event of America’s Freedom Festival at Provo, Utah, on July 1, 2021.
President Dallin H. Oaks of the First Presidency greets attendees at the Freedom Awards Gala, an event of America’s Freedom Festival at Provo, Utah, on July 1, 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

President Oaks credited God and the accomplishments of others during his remarks at the Freedom Awards Gala by America’s Freedom Festival at Provo on Thursday, July 1. “Almighty God … has given us our inspired United States Constitution,” he said. “He acted through the wisdom and courage of our Founding Fathers.”

Read about the honor and see the video

2. What Elder Holland and Sister Eubank said about supporting refugees who are religiously oppressed

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles participates virtually in the 2021 AMAR Windsor Dialogue Conference, held June 21-23, 2021, at the historic Cumberland Lodge, in Windsor, England.
Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles participates virtually in the 2021 AMAR Windsor Dialogue Conference, held June 21-23, 2021, at the historic Cumberland Lodge, in Windsor, England. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Elder Holland, Sister Eubank and Elder Gary B. Sabin, a General Authority Seventy and president of the Europe Area, spoke at the conference based in the Cumberland Lodge in Windsor, England, about the mental and emotional health of millions in refugee camps — and the support they need in expressing religious faith.

Find out about the conference and Sister Eubank’s ‘three critical suggestions’

3. Society has become ‘tone deaf to the music of faith,’ says Elder Cook during religious liberty summit. Here’s the solution

Elder Quentin L. Cook of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Sister Mary G. Cook, laugh with the Rev. Eugene Rivers, left, and Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York, during the Notre Dame Religious Liberty Summit at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana, on Monday, June 28, 2021.
Elder Quentin L. Cook of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Sister Mary G. Cook, laugh with the Rev. Eugene Rivers, left, and Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York, during the Notre Dame Religious Liberty Summit at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana, on Monday, June 28, 2021. Credit: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

“My plea today is that all religions work together to defend faith and religious freedom in a manner that protects people of diverse faith as well as those of no faith,” said Elder Cook said at the Notre Dame Religious Liberty Summit, June 28-29 on the campus of the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana.

His remarks followed a keynote address by Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York. Dr. Jacqueline Rivers of The Seymour Institute for Black Church and Policy Studies and Rabbi Meir Soloveichik of the Congregation Shearith Israel joined Cardinal Dolan and Elder Cook on the Interfaith Dialogue Panel.

See more from the summit from Elder Cook and Cardinal Dolan, plus watch the video about why religious liberty matters

4. Sister Aburto on mental, emotional health and the power of turning to the Savior for comfort

Sister Reyna I. Aburto of the Relief Society general presidency shares about mental and emotional health and the power of turning to the Savior for comfort in this podcast episode.
Sister Reyna I. Aburto of the Relief Society general presidency shares about mental and emotional health and the power of turning to the Savior for comfort in this podcast episode. Credit: Church News

Emotions are just part of the soul of all human beings, said Sister Aburto, who also shared how her family has been affected by mental health challenges. “[Emotions] are with us all day, every day. And sometimes for us, it is very hard to really understand them or to manage them.”

Listen to the podcast and read about what she hopes people can learn

5. New Zealand, Ghana MTCs join Provo MTC in resuming onsite training of new missionaries

As his family says farewell, an elder arrives at the New Zealand Missionary Training Center in Auckland, New Zealand, on June 30, 2021.
As his family says farewell, an elder arrives at the New Zealand Missionary Training Center in Auckland, New Zealand, on June 30, 2021. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The latest to reopen for in-person training of full-time missionaries was the New Zealand Missionary Training Center, which welcomed 25 new missionaries on June 30. The flagship Provo Missionary Training Center was the first to resume onsite training of new elders and sisters, beginning on June 23 with 248 new missionaries. The Ghana MTC had 48 new missionaries arrive for its reopening last week.

Learn which MTCs are reopening next

6. The Family History Library is reopening on Tuesday. Here are 6 new things to look for

Sister Pamela Sheffield and Sister Vergie Scroughams work on the second floor of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ newly remodeled Family History Library in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 29, 2021.
Sister Pamela Sheffield and Sister Vergie Scroughams work on the second floor of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ newly remodeled Family History Library in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 29, 2021. Credit: Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

While doors to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City have been closed to the public for nearly 16 months due to COVID-19, construction crews have been hard at work executing a remodeling. The new changes were primarily designed to make the library’s services more accessible. 

What’s new about the Family History Library

7. ‘A celebration of faith’: Church members mark 60th anniversary of missionary work in the Philippines

On 28 April 28, 1961, around 100 Latter-day Saints gathered on the grounds of the American War Memorial Cemetery at Fort Bonifacio as Elder Gordon B. Hinckley, then an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, rededicated the Philippines for missionary work.
On 28 April 28, 1961, around 100 Latter-day Saints gathered on the grounds of the American War Memorial Cemetery at Fort Bonifacio as Elder Gordon B. Hinckley, then an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, rededicated the Philippines for missionary work. Credit: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

It’s been 60 years since then-Elder Gordon B. Hinckley rededicated the Philippines for missionary work. Now, there are more than 825,000 members in 1,250 congregations, 23 missions, and two dedicated temples, with five more temples announced or under construction, across the nation of more than 7,100 islands in the western Pacific Ocean’s Southeast Asia region

Find out about the Church’s history in the Philippines and the ‘celebration of faith’

8. Home at last: Remains of Pearl Harbor sailor identified, laid to rest in Idaho cemetery

A U.S. Navy Honor Guard bears the casket of Navy Fireman 2nd Class Carl M. Bradley, who was 19 on Dec. 7, 1941, during the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was among more than 400 killed on board the U.S.S. Oklahoma but whose remains were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific until DNA research allowed his family to return him home 80 years later for burial in Shelley, Idaho. The services were held June 26, 2021.
A U.S. Navy Honor Guard bears the casket of Navy Fireman 2nd Class Carl M. Bradley, who was 19 on Dec. 7, 1941, during the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was among more than 400 killed on board the U.S.S. Oklahoma but whose remains were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific until DNA research allowed his family to return him home 80 years later for burial in Shelley, Idaho. The services were held June 26, 2021. Credit: Julie Dockstader Heaps

Eight decades after U.S. Navy Fireman 2nd Class Carl Merrill Bradley was killed in the attack at Pearl Harbor, with DNA technology finally accounting for his remains, a flag-draped casket was sent home for military burial rites a few miles from the gray-stucco family home where he was raised with 12 siblings.

Meet Carl Bradley through the eyes of his family, including his last living sibling

9. Latter-day Saint soccer star Olivia Moultrie, 15, becomes youngest player in NWSL history

Latter-day Saint soccer player Olivia Moultrie, shown in this file photo competing for a youth U.S. National Team, became the youngest player in the history of the National Women's Soccer League on June 30, 2021.
Latter-day Saint soccer player Olivia Moultrie, shown in this file photo competing for a youth U.S. National Team, became the youngest player in the history of the National Women’s Soccer League on June 30, 2021. Credit: K.C. Moultrie

Olivia Moultrie first made news in the soccer community when, at age 11, she verbally committed to play at the University of North Carolina. This week she signed a multiyear deal with the Portland Thorns of the National Women’s Soccer League, one of the world’s premier women’s professional soccer leagues. She is the youngest player to ever sign with an NWSL squad. 

Read how she credits her faith and family for keeping her grounded