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In case you missed it: President Nelson oldest latter-day Apostle, tithing announcement, plus 7 other stories

Read 9 Church News stories from the week of Aug. 7-13


During the week of Aug. 7-13, President Russell M. Nelson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints became the oldest Apostle of this dispensation, and invited others to share how they nourish their testimony. The Church also announced changes to the tithing settlement process.

President Dallin H. Oaks, first counselor in the First Presidency, celebrated his 90th birthday with an appearance on the Church News podcast, and he shared 12 lessons he’s learned in nine decades. A three-part series on religious freedom outlined the importance of protecting this right for all God’s children. The Church introduced a new historian and recorder.

Latter-day Saint artist Dan Wilson painted a mural of the Second Coming for the Washington D.C. Temple. Counselors and experts outlined resources for leaders and members for ministering in a crisis. And a Texas missionary won a major award for his volunteer work on his service mission.

Find out more about these stories below.

1. President Nelson is the oldest latter-day Apostle

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President Russell M. Nelson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints poses in his office at the Church Administration Building in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, April 13, 2022.

Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

Four months after he became the oldest President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, President Nelson now has become the Church’s longest-living Apostle in this latter-day dispensation.

As of Aug. 8, 2022, President Nelson — who was born Sept. 9, 1924, in Salt Lake City — has lived for 35,764 total days, or just a day shy of 97 years and 11 months if using calendar dates.

Compare the dates with others who have served

2. ‘Tithing declaration’ to replace tithing settlement, First Presidency announces

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A screenshot of the Church’s online donation screen shows a new “General Offerings” category that has replaced “Book of Mormon,” “Temple Construction,” “Perpetual Education” and other discontinued categories.

Screenshot from ChurchofJesusChrist.org

The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced changes to improve the tithing settlement process. 

The term “tithing settlement” has now been changed to “tithing declaration.”

“This change emphasizes that the primary purpose of this interview is to provide members with an opportunity to declare their tithing faithfulness, not to ‘settle’ an account,” the First Presidency wrote in a letter to general and local priesthood leaders, dated Thursday, Aug. 11.

Find out what’s different

3. President Nelson’s invitation and responses

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President Russell M. Nelson, president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, tweeted on Aug. 10. He said, “Recently, I invited you to ‘take charge of your own testimony.’ Please share with me what steps you are taking to accomplish this. I can’t wait to be inspired by you!”

Screenshot from Twitter

On Aug. 10, President Nelson posted on social media, “Recently, I invited you to ‘take charge of your own testimony.’ Please share with me what steps you are taking to accomplish this. I can’t wait to be inspired by you!”

See the invitation and the responses

4. President Dallin H. Oaks celebrates his 90th birthday

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In episode 96 of the Church News podcast, President Dallin H. Oaks, first counselor in the First Presidency, reflects on the lessons learned in nine decades.

Screenshot

President Oaks celebrated a landmark birthday on Aug. 12. Born in 1932 to Stella and Lloyd E. Oaks, the first counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints turned 90.

Listen to the podcast, find out the 12 lessons he’s learned, reflect with him on his life through this video, and read 9 quotes from the past year

5. Why does religious liberty matter?

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President Dallin H. Oaks, first counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, smiles during an interview at the Rome Temple Visitors’ Center on Tuesday, July 19, 2022.

Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

ROME, ITALY — President Oaks has spoken about religious freedom for much of his 38-year Apostolic ministry.  

It is a subject he has been prepared to address, said the first counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

See the 3-part series

6. Meet the new Church historian and recorder: Elder Kyle S. McKay

Elder Kyle S. McKay, General Authority Seventy, smiles for a photo in the Church History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Elder Kyle S. McKay, General Authority Seventy, smiles for a photo in the Church History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022. Elder McKay began serving as the new Church historian and recorder on Aug. 1, 2022.

Cristy Powell, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Elder Kyle S. McKay, a General Authority Seventy, has felt drawn to a certain scripture since he became the Church historian and recorder on Aug. 1. 

In Doctrine and Covenants 47, John Whitmer was called to serve as the Church’s historian and recorder in March 1831. Doctrine and Covenants 69 includes instructions for John Whitmer in his calling. 

“He was given a mandate to gather up histories and writings and things that would be of value to the Church and the rising generations that would grow up in Zion, and I have felt drawn to that,” Elder McKay said about Doctrine and Covenants 69:8. “Since learning of this assignment, I have felt drawn to the rising generations and to protect them and to build their faith.”

Get to know Elder McKay

7. Meet the artist who painted a mural for the Washington D.C. Temple

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Artist Dan Wilson in his studio in Lehi, Utah.

Howard Collett

Most budding artists start their career in a spare room at home, crowding out other family needs. Dan Wilson was no exception — starting in an upstairs bedroom. Over the next few years, he graduated to the living room and then to a portion of the unfinished basement that eventually had four walls and a door. 

“Paint was everywhere,” smiled Heather Wilson, Dan Wilson’s wife of 13 years. “We still find paint in random places all over the house — even in the freezer. I thought it would always be that way.”

See more of Dan Wilson’s painting of the Second Coming

8. How Psychological First Aid can help Church leaders and individuals be a support to others during a crisis

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Two women visit another woman at her home to help her after she has hurt her leg.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Refugees fleeing a bombed city. Survivors of an earthquake. Families devastated by suicide. Witnesses to a tragic accident. There are so many who need support and ministering care in a crisis. Learning Psychological First Aid can help.

Psychological First Aid was developed by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and the National Center for PTSD. It is an evidence-informed approach to help anyone after a traumatic event.

Read part 1 about Psychological First Aid and part 2 about how those in the Europe Area developed new training to help others minister during a crisis

9. Texas missionary honored for good works on service mission

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Elder Caleb Wood with his mission leaders, Sister Julie Atkinson and Elder Mark Atkinson; and Courtney Weaver, front, operations manager at Trusted World, at the awards ceremony where Elder Wood was given the Spirit of Volunteerism award in Dallas, Texas, May 4, 2022.

Wood family

Elder Caleb Wood doesn’t think his story is special. But the standing ovation said otherwise. At a special banquet on July 21, Elder Wood was named the Dallas, Texas, “Volunteer of the Year” by D CEO Magazine for his work at the nonprofit organization Trusted World.

“I’ve been asked several times why serving is so important to me,” Elder Wood said in his acceptance speech that night. “The more I answer that question, the more I realize my answer is kind of selfish — I like making others happy, and making others happy makes me happy.”

Learn how Elder Wood serves through health challenges

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