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5 recent donations from the Church to hospitals, schools in Africa

Wheelchairs, medical equipment, school furniture and other donations were made in Ghana, Uganda, Republic of Congo and Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints recently donated hospital equipment, school furnishings, wheelchairs and other medical supplies during several donation events in countries in the Africa West and Africa Central areas.

Each event was attended by beneficiaries as well as educational, health and government officials, who thanked the Church for its contributions and gifts. Church leaders took the opportunity to explain more about how members around the world donate to humanitarian funding and strive to follow the teachings of Jesus Christ to love God and love their neighbors.

Following are five recent examples of donations by the Church in Africa.

1. Hospital equipment in Accra, Ghana

Elder S. Gifford Nielsen, General Authority Seventy and president of the Africa West Area, and the Ga Mantse, His Majesty King Nii Tackie Teiko Tsuro-II, speak together at an event marking Church donations to Princess Marie Louise Hospital in Accra, Ghana, on March 3, 2023. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church donated medical and technology equipment to the Princess Marie Louise Hospital in Accra, Ghana, on March 3.

The Africa West Area presidency — Elder S. Gifford Nielsen, Elder Jörg Klebingat and Elder Alfred Kyungu, all General Authority Seventies — joined with the Ga Mantse, His Majesty King Nii Tackie Teiko Tsuru II, the traditional king of the Ga State in Accra, to present the donation.

The Church donation included incubators and computer equipment as well as other needed supplies and equipment, reported the Church’s Africa Newsroom.

Elder Nielsen began his remarks by quoting Luke 18:16-17, where the Savior said, “Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God.”

He shared his love for the people of Ghana and his desire for the Church to continue to collaborate with government officials.

“We asked, what can we do to help?” he said. “By being together here today, we are doing what we were asked to do, help the little children.”

The Ga Mantse, who is one of the prominent rulers in Ghana, said he would be remiss not to convey his profound gratitude to the Church for the hospital equipment.

“They have done multiple humanitarian works in Ghana, including provision of water, interventions in sanitation, construction of places of convenience for children and enhancement of health care. For all this we are most grateful,” he said.

As the event was concluding, the Ga Mantse turned to Elder Nielsen and said, “This feels good, this feels right.” Elder Nielsen nodded and said, “I agree.”

2. Wheelchairs in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Local leaders from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the United Nations, and three Democratic Republic of the Congo government ministers present new wheelchairs to people in need in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Feb. 13, 2023. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

In partnership with government and private aid workers, the Church purchased and delivered hundreds of wheelchairs, crutches, walkers and canes in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Hundreds of persons living with disabilities attended an event marking the donations on Feb. 13, reported the Church’s Africa Newsroom. One man who was the first to receive a new wheelchair said he has had to walk with his hands since birth, but now, he can move freely around his home.

The nonmotorized wheelchairs were designed to navigate difficult urban terrain. They enable users to move and steer simultaneously by pressing the steering column forward and pulling it backward, instead of using their hands to rotate the wheels.

Elder David Ngabizele, an Area Seventy in the Africa Central Area, and Didier Mutombo, the area welfare and self-reliance manager, attended the event.

Elder Ngabizele recounted the Church’s many humanitarian projects in the Democratic Republic of the Congo over the past several years.

He quoted Jesus Christ in Matthew 25:40 when He said, “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.”

He also cited King Benjamin in the Book of Mormon, who said, “When ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God.” (Mosiah 2:17).

3. Medical equipment in Brazzaville, Republic of Congo

Elder Charden Ndinga, Area Seventy in the Africa Central Area, left, attends an event to present a certificate of donation to leaders of the Integrated Health Center in Brazzaville, Republic of Congo, Feb. 8, 2023. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church donated medical equipment and refurbished buildings to the Integrated Health Center of Kinsoundi, in Brazzaville, Republic of Congo, on Feb. 8.

Elder Charden Ndinga, an Area Seventy in the Africa Central Area, and Makelekele Republic of Congo Stake President Jean C. Mayala attended the official ceremony marking the donation, along with medical and health officials and government leaders from the Makelekele and Kinsoundi districts, reported the Church’s Africa Newsroom.

Elder Ndinga explained that the money raised to carry out this project was donated by Church members, and the aim of the donation was to bring relief to the Kinsoundi IHC staff and to the community of the Makelekele district.

4. Hospital equipment in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Haut Katanga Province Health Minister Joseph Sambi, left, and Elder Pungwe Kongolo, Area Seventy in the Africa Central Area, right, walk from the neonatal center handover ceremony in the Jason Sendwe Hospital in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Feb. 2, 2023. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church donated medical equipment and supplies and funded renovations to the neonatal building of the Jason Sendwe Hospital in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Feb. 2. The hospital is managed by the University of Lubumbashi and is the largest in Katanga Province.

The Church’s donation included an X-ray machine, two anesthesia machines, an electrocardiogram, monitors, surgical tools and medication for newborns. The Church also paid to renovate and repaint rooms, said a notice in the Church’s Africa Newsroom.

The Church was represented by Elder Pungwe Kongolo, an Area Seventy in the Africa Central Area, who is also a physician by profession.

He explained: “This large project demonstrates our love for our neighbors. The Church tries its best to provide humanitarian aid when possible, by following in Jesus Christ’s footsteps.”  

5. Upgrades to a school in Entebbe, Uganda

Kampala Uganda South Stake President Ambrose S. Kilama, center left, and Michael Kakembo, a member of parliament in Entebbe, center right, cut the ribbon to a new classroom building with Joyce Nalubega, district education officer, far right, and a student named Andrew, far left, in Entebbe, Uganda, on Jan. 28, 2023. Church funding allowed significant upgrades to the school. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church funded significant upgrades to the Entebbe Parents Senior Secondary School in Entebbe, Uganda, starting in October 2022 and finishing in January 2023. The Muslim-founded school serves about 1,000 students from low-income families, reported the Church’s Africa Newsroom.

The upgrades included new classrooms, latrines, water tanks, desks, tables and chairs. A ceremony marking the completion took place on Jan. 28.

Joining representatives from government and education at the ceremony were Kampala Uganda South Stake President Ambrose S. Kilama, Mengo Ward Bishop Emmanuel D. Mutesasira and Elder Dennis Bird and Sister Merrily Bird, full-time humanitarian missionaries for the Church, who supervised the construction project.

President Kilama explained that the funding for the project was made possible by donations from members of the Church around the world.

“I commend the school for giving scholarships to needy students regardless of their circumstances. We are happy to be a partner in improving the school,” President Kilama said. “Despite our differences, humanity is what unites us all together.”

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