Menu

See 1st interior images, video of new Red Cliffs Utah Temple

The second house of the Lord in St. George, Utah, begins its open-house phase with media day Monday, Jan. 29

For the second time in less than three months in St. George, Utah, a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is opening for public tours, with the Church offering the first look inside the newest house of the Lord prior to its dedication.

In conjunction with the Monday, Jan. 29, media day conducted at the new Red Cliffs Utah Temple in southeast St. George, the Church released a video and two dozen interior and exterior photos of the new temple, including nearly 20 photos of the rooms, furnishings, designs and details from inside the new house of the Lord.

Elder Hugo E. Martinez, a General Authority Seventy and first counselor in the Church’s Utah Area presidency, presided at Monday’s 10 a.m. event, welcoming media representatives to tour the new temple and explaining the purpose of the temple and the covenants and ordinances associated with the house of the Lord.

Several days of tours for invited guests — including local community, business, educational and faith leaders — will follow, with public tours available Thursday, Feb. 1, through Saturday, March 2, excluding Sundays.

The celestial room of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The celestial room of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple in St. George, Utah. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

President Henry B. Eyring, second counselor in the First Presidency, will dedicate the Red Cliffs Utah Temple on Sunday, March 24, in two sessions, at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., with the sessions broadcast to all units throughout the temple district.

The Red Cliff temple video and photos were first published Monday, Jan. 29, on ChurchofJesusChrist.org.

The recommend desk of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The interior lobby and recommend desk of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

1 city, 2 temples and their milestone events

The open house and dedication come on the heels of similar events conducted for the recently renovated and rededicated St. George Utah Temple, the Church’s oldest house of the Lord still in operation. It was first dedicated in 1877.

Following its extensive renovation over two-plus years, the St. George temple hosted its public open house beginning Sept. 15, 2023, and concluding Nov. 15, less than three months ago. President Jeffrey R. Holland, acting president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, rededicated the St. George Utah Temple on Dec. 10.

President Holland, a native of St. George, also presided at the Nov. 7, 2020, groundbreaking of the Red Cliffs temple.

The baptismal font of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The baptismal font of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The two open houses and the rededication of the older temple and the dedication of the new one mark the first time that such milestone events for two houses of the Lord have been held so closely together in both time and location.

St. George becomes the fourth city worldwide — and third in Utah — to have two temples of the Church of Jesus Christ, joining South Jordan, Utah; Provo, Utah; and Lima, Peru. The latter had its second temple dedicated last month, the Lima Peru Los Olivos Temple, on Jan. 14, meaning the list of two-temple cities doubled already in 2024.

And the 3.1 miles between the St. George and Red Cliffs temples is the second-shortest distance between two houses of the Lord, behind the 2.4 miles between the Provo Utah and Provo City Center temples and just ahead of the 3.5 miles between the Jordan River Utah and Oquirrh Mountain Utah temples in South Jordan.

A sealing room in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
A sealing room in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Exterior and interior features

Designed in the desert modern and neoclassical architectural styles, the 96,277-square-foot structure of concrete, steel and precast concrete sits on the grounds spanning 15.31 acres, with a palm-tree-lined entrance boulevard running north and south. The desert’s simplicity, symmetry and color are seen in both the exterior and interior of the temple.

A water feature with three reflecting pools and waterfalls and accompanying seats sit on the temple’s north side, with shade structures on both the east and west sides. A pair of trellis structures and a garden area adorn the south side, expected to be used for wedding celebrations and other gatherings.

The Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The Red Cliffs Utah Temple in southeastern St. George, Utah. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Motifs in the coral-and-beige-toned precast exterior are inspired by the grand cottonwood trees, mountains and canyons of southern Utah, with stylized cottonwood leaves seen on the top of the exterior walls and tower.

The temple also features exterior arches as well as a vertical emphasis with deep pilasters — rectangular columns projecting from a wall. The pilasters are an architectural cue from the Church’s Wilshire Ward meetinghouse in Los Angeles, California.

The art-glass motifs include the florals and colors of the desert, such as the bearclaw poppy, which is the main motif inside. An endangered endemic species, the poppy has a small, white, four-petal flower with distinct leaves that are jagged and have three “claws” covered in small, soft hairs.

The bride’s room in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The bride’s room in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Other interior motifs include succulents, Indian paintbrush and pomegranates.  

The exterior art glass has coral, purple, green and gold colors and regional plants — the lower floors with the Indian paintbrush and the upper levels the succulents in hues of purple and green.

Lighting features and the baptismal font area are inspired by leaf shapes and area succulents, while stone and tile patterns suggest the layered structures of local mountains.

The water feature of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The water feature and reflecting pools of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Background of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple

St. George’s newest house of the Lord originally was referred to as the Washington County Utah Temple when President Russell M. Nelson announced plans in October 2018 general conference for a second temple in the area. The Washington County name was still referenced when the site location — northeast of 3000 East and 1580 South in southeastern St. George — and preliminary building size were published a year later, in November 2019.

The First Presidency later approved the new name, the Red Cliffs Utah Temple, in June 2020.

Then-Elder Holland presided at the Nov. 7, 2020, groundbreaking. Joined there by his wife, the late Sister Patricia T. Holland, their three children and extended family members, Elder Holland said his thoughts of the future temple turned to “coming home” to the house of the Lord.

The grand staircase of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The grand staircase of the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

“As we talk about home, safety, peace and people who love you, that is a description of the temple — it is the safest, the most welcoming and reassuring place in the world,” he said.

Temples are filled with love and people who will “help and encourage you,” he added.

“The symbolism of our coming home is for me a nice metaphor of coming home to the house of the Lord and being surrounded by people on both sides of the veil — angels, living and deceased — who love you and watch out for you. That is really home. That is the safest, happiest, most family-oriented place in the world.”

A waiting area in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
A waiting area in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

On Oct. 16, 2023, the First Presidency announced the dedication and open house dates for the Red Cliffs temple.

Temples in Utah

The Red Cliffs and St. George temples are two of 28 total dedicated, awaiting dedication or under construction in the state of Utah, home of the Church’s world headquarters and nearly 2.2 million Latter-day Saints.

In addition to the St. George temple, Utah’s currently operating temples are the Bountiful, Brigham City, Cedar City, DraperJordan RiverLoganMonticello, Mount Timpanogos, Ogden, Oquirrh Mountain, Orem, Payson, Provo, Provo City Center, Saratoga Springs and Vernal temples.

An instruction room in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
An instruction room in the Red Cliffs Utah Temple. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Like the St. George temple was, the Salt Lake and Manti temples are under renovation, with the reconstruction of the Provo Utah Temple to begin in late February. The Manti temple is scheduled for rededication on April 21.

The Taylorsville Utah Temple is scheduled for dedication on June 2 and the Layton Utah Temple two weeks later on June 16. Six other Utah temples are under construction — Deseret Peak, Ephraim, Heber ValleyLindonSmithfield and Syracuse.

The Red Cliffs Utah Temple.
The Red Cliffs Utah Temple in St. George, Utah. | The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Red Cliffs Utah Temple

Address: 1555 S. Red Cliffs Temple Lane, St. George, Utah 84790

Temple announced: Oct. 7, 2018, by President Russell M. Nelson

Groundbreaking: Nov. 7, 2020, by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland

Construction start: Nov. 9, 2020

To be dedicated: March 24, 2024, by President Henry B. Eyring

Public open house: Thursday, Feb. 1, through Saturday, March 2 (excluding Sundays)

Property size: 15.31 acres

Building size: 96,277 square feet

Height to top of Angel Moroni statue: 230 feet

Related Story
Elder and Sister Holland at ‘home’ with Red Cliffs Utah Temple groundbreaking
President Holland rededicates St. George Utah Temple; ‘I consider this one of the sweetest and most rewarding assignments I have had’
Newsletters
Subscribe for free and get daily or weekly updates straight to your inbox
The three things you need to know everyday
Highlights from the last week to keep you informed

At the Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra’s first concert of its Philippine tour, Elder Neil L. Andersen noted talents and dedication of audience and performers.

See how YSAs have gathered around the world from Cambodia to Africa.

Speaking to more than 100 gathered in the Church History Museum auditorium, Elder Kyle S. McKay, a General Authority Seventy, explored several key historic events of Church history to show a pattern of continued revelation in the restoration of the gospel.

Elder Andersen teaches elementary school students about family, President Lund tells ‘outcast’ young men that the Lord has blessings for them, Sister Wright posts about ‘seeing’ others.

In the Church News video "Nauvoo Exodus," leaders and those in historic Nauvoo, Illinois, remember early Church members as they make the mile-long walk down Parley Street to the Mississippi River.

BYU Women's Conference has announced its 2024 keynote speakers. Young women and their leaders are invited to join a Wednesday evening event.